Articles on Opioid addiction epidemic

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Physical therapists Steven Hunter and Laura Hayes teach an unidentified patient lumbar stabilization exercises at the Equal Access Clinic in Gainesville, Florida. Maria Belen Farias, UF Health Photography

Physical therapy could lower need for opioids, but lack of money and time are hurdles

As the nation grapples with its opioid addiction epidemic, one solution for many with chronic joint pain and back pain could be physical therapy. But it's often underutilized. Here's why.
Helping people with pain, whether it be physical or emotional, could limit the need for opioids. eldar nurkovic/Shutterstock.com

How understanding pain could curb opioid addiction

A bill to deal with the opioid crisis recently came out of a Senate committee. While some of its recommendations are good, some key points are missing.
Vivitrol, a non-opioid medication, is used to treat some cases of opioid dependence. Addiction specialists stress that not all patients need medication, but that many do. AP Photo/Carla K. Carlson

Why treating addiction with medication should be carefully considered

The U.S. has had multiple drug epidemics, and, until recently, has not had evidence-tested ways to help people. That has changed. New medicines can help. But other medical issues should also be addressed.
Paul Wright, in treatment for opioid addiction in June 2017 at the Neil Kennedy Recovery Clinic in Youngstown Ohio, shows a photo of himself from 2015, when he almost died from an overdose. AP Photo/David Dermer

How Big Pharma is hindering treatment of the opioid addiction epidemic

The number of people dying from opioid overdose continues to rise, in part because of cheap street drugs. Yet the price of a drug used to treat addiction is out of reach for many.

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