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Articles on Organs

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A limited supply of donor organs, paired with a massive demand for transplants, has fuelled the global organ trafficking industry, which exploits poor, underprivileged and persecuted members of society as a source of organs to be purchased by wealthy transplant tourists. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)

Killing prisoners for transplants: Forced organ harvesting in China

China’s industrial-scale organ trafficking practice has been executing prisoners of conscience and using their organs for transplantation for decades. This is known as forced organ harvesting.
Xenotransplantation is the transplanting of cells, tissues or organs from animals to humans. Pre-clinical trials of organ transplant from pigs have addressed some of the technical barriers. (Shutterstock)

Organ transplants from pigs: Medical miracle or pandemic in the making?

New developments in organ transplants from animals show promise. However, there has been no public engagement about a potential risk. It may streamline a pathway to humans for new zoonotic diseases.
This Bioculture System will let biologists learn about how space impacts human health by studying cells grown in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station. NASA/Ames Research Center/Dominic Hart

Why are scientists trying to manufacture organs in space?

Why are scientists trying to grow organs at the International Space Station? People live on Earth not in zero-gravity. A stem cell expert explains why it is useful to do these experiments in space.
When you have a wound, your body gets to work straight away to clean it out, kill germs and repair the skin. Shutterstock/Yakobchuk Viacheslav

Curious Kids: how do wounds heal?

The body tries to plug a wound quickly to stop germs getting in through broken skin and making you sick. But behind the scenes, your blood is working hard to repair a wound.
If you have been drinking more water than your body needs, the body tells the kidney filters to get rid of the spare water. That’s when your urine will look paler. Shutterstock

Curious Kids: why is urine yellow?

One of the waste products that your kidneys put into your urine is a chemical called urobilin, and it is yellow.
Fluorescence microscopy image of the newly formed blood vessels after injection of our seaweed-derived hydrogel in a muscle. In green are the blood vessels and in blue the cell nuclei. Aurelien Forget, Roberto Gianni-Barrera, Andrea Banfi and Prasad Shastri

Edible seaweed can be used to grow blood vessels in the body

Small wounds can usually heal by themselves, but larger wounds can be a problem. With a little help from a seaweed we can help the body regenerate new blood vessels.

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