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Articles on Privacy

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New DNA analysis revealed that Calvin Hoover killed Christine Jessop in 1984. Toronto Police Chief James Ramer sits next to a screen displaying photos of Calvin Hoover during a news conference on Oct. 15, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Christine Jessop’s killer identified: Solved cold case raises questions about genetic privacy

Christine Jessop was murdered in 1984 and, 36 years later, DNA evidence finally identified her killer. But the police investigation's use of genetic genealogical databases raised questions about privacy.
Differential privacy lets organizations collect people’s data while protecting their privacy, but it’s not foolproof. imaginima/E+ via Getty Images

People want data privacy but don’t always know what they’re getting

Differential privacy lets people to share data anonymously, but people need to know more about it to make informed decisions.
Facial recognition algorithms are usually tested using white faces, which results in the technology being unable to differentiate between racialized individuals. (Shutterstock)

AI technologies — like police facial recognition — discriminate against people of colour

Technology is not neutral, as facial recognition algorithms and predictive policing have shown us. Algorithms discriminate by design, reflecting and reinforcing pre-existing biases.
Not everyone who votes at home gets to do so in complete privacy. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Voting by mail is convenient, but not always secret

Voting at home is safe from fraud and disease, but gives up a key advantage of in-person voting at official polling places: a secure, safe environment where everyone can cast their ballot secretly.
Podium placards promoting the COVID Alert app are seen on a table on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, on July 31, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Canada’s COVID Alert app is a case of tech-driven bad policy design

Canada’s COVID Alert app maybe be privacy-safe, but the government has failed to release any information about what effect it expects it to have on COVID-19 transmission.
Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos speaks via video conference during a House Judiciary subcommittee hearing on antitrust on Capitol Hill on July 29, 2020, in Washington. (Pool via AP/Graeme Jennings)

How open data could tame Big Tech’s power and avoid a breakup

Taming Big Tech's market power requires addressing their monopoly over user-related data collection instead of employing traditional antitrust measures such as breaking up the firms.

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