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Articles on Privacy

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Handwritten diaries and digital diaries both help preserve experiences and memories, but in different ways. luza studios/E+ via Getty Images

Handwritten diaries may feel old fashioned, but they offer insights that digital diaries just can’t match

As material objects, diaries give scholars an intimate look into their subjects’ lives, including handwriting and mementos. What if diaries in the future are nothing but insubstantial digital ghosts?
In hackathons, people come together to build more extensive and cohesive datasets. (Shutterstock)

Hackathons should be renamed to avoid negative connotations

“Hackathons” can imply breaching security and privacy. To more accurately reflect their creative and constructive intent, they can be referred to instead as “datathons” or “code fests.”
Social media is flush with advice urging non-menstruating people to use period tracking apps in order to trip up the apps’ algorithms. Westend61 via Getty Images

No, submitting junk data to period tracking apps won’t protect reproductive privacy

It would take huge numbers of people submitting bad data to affect the algorithms behind period tracking apps, but even then it would be more harmful than helpful.
Even with optimal treatment, asthma and COPD patients encounter unpredictable flareups of their conditions, which can become life-threatening and need immediate medical attention. (Shutterstock)

Listening to asthma and COPD: An AI-powered wearable could monitor respiratory health

Researchers are developing an AI-powered device to detect asthma and COPD symptoms in real-time for faster treatment. The ‘patch’ listens to airway sounds, but filters out speech to protect privacy.
DNA is a trove of personal information that can be hard to keep track of and protect. Boris Zhitkov/Moment via Getty Images

Genetic paparazzi are right around the corner, and courts aren’t ready to confront the legal quagmire of DNA theft

Both Macron and Madonna have expressed concerns about genetic privacy. As DNA collection and sequencing becomes increasingly commonplace, what may seem paranoid may instead be prescient.

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