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Articles on Privacy law

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Police see some difficult scenes; body cameras can record those and make them public. Tony Webster via Flickr

Body cameras help monitor police but can invade people’s privacy

Police body cameras have the potential to make private details about people’s lives, including some of the most stressful experiences of their lives, public and easily accessible online
People are reflected on a volunteer’s sunglasses outside a neighborhood alley in Beijing that is closed due to the COVID-19 outbreak on March 1, 2020. AP Photo/Andy Wong

With coronavirus containment efforts, what are the privacy rights of patients?

Some measures taken in China to contain the COVID-19 outbreak have raised concerns about patient privacy. As other countries bring in containment measures, will patient privacy be compromised?
DNA database giant Ancestry lets members access international records including the convict and free settler lists, passenger lists, Australian and New Zealand electoral rolls and military records. Patrick Alexander/Flickr

If you’ve given your DNA to a DNA database, US police may now have access to it

A US judge has allowed police access to the major DNA database without users’ consent (including Australian users). It’s a timely reminder that we urgently need genetic privacy legislation.
Jeremy Lee, a sawmill worker in Imbil, Queensland, refused to have his fingerprints scanned for a new security system introduced by his employer to replace swipe cards. www.shutterstock.com

As privacy is lost a fingerprint at a time, a biometric rebel asserts our rights

Biometric data is forever. Any employer seeking to collect it has big obligations to meet. And employees have the right to object.

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