Articles on public monuments

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A damaged Confederate statue lies on a pallet in a warehouse in Durham, N.C. on Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, after protesters yanked it off its pedestal in front of a government building. AP Photo/Allen Breed

A Confederate statue graveyard could help bury the Old South

Where do old Confederate statues go when they die? The former Soviet bloc countries could teach the US something about dealing with monuments from a painful past.
More than 40 lynchings have been documented in Maryland. Shutterstock

Maryland has created a truth commission on lynchings – can it deliver?

The first truth commission to research lynchings has been established in Maryland. It has the potential to educate the public about and support racial reconciliation. But it also faces obstacles.
The statue of Captain Cook in St Kilda, Melbourne, was painted pink on January 25 2018. DAVID CROSLING

How Captain Cook became a contested national symbol

The federal government will spend nearly $50 million over four years to commemorate Captain Cook's first landing. But some have questioned the spend.
Students should be taught to recognise the political, social, and economic factors that influence how a society conducts and participates in memorialisation of the past. David Crosling/AAP

Why children need to be taught to think critically about Remembrance Day

Teaching students to recognise and understanding the political, social, and economic factors that influence how we celebrate Remembrance Day would make them more active citizens.
The federal government is renaming the Langevin Block building on Parliament Hill out of respect for Indigenous peoples. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Instead of renaming buildings, why not truly improve Indigenous lives?

The Langevin Block on Parliament Hill is being renamed out of respect for Indigenous people. But instead of renaming buildings, let's offer meaningful change to the Indigenous.
Aboriginal dancers from Pinjarra perform at the unveiling of the counter-memorial in Esplanade Park, Fremantle, April 9 1994. Courtesy Bruce Scates

Monumental errors: how Australia can fix its racist colonial statues

A Fremantle monument to three white explorers was revised in 1994 to acknowledge the violence committed against Indigenous owners. As Australia struggles to reconcile its racist past, perhaps this monument shows a way forward.

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