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Articles on Refugee health

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A Ukrainian woman who fled the war is pictured with her son after they crossed into Moldova on March 18, 2022. Andrea Mancini/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Ukrainian female refugees are fleeing a war, but in some cases more violence awaits them where they find shelter

While most people offering support to Ukrainians are well-intentioned, it’s not always the case. There are a reports of women and girls fleeing Ukraine being raped in their new countries.
A migrant covered with a blanket passes in front of dumped garbage outside the Moria refugee camp on the island of Lesbos, Greece, Jan. 21, 2020. (AP Photo/Aggelos Barai)

Refugees at increased risk of coronavirus due to barriers to healthcare

Based on how other diseases have moved through refugee camps, there is an urgent need to protect refugees in camps and informal settlements from COVID-19.
Maryam Sadat Montajabi, centre left, and her daughter Romina Khaksar, 15, who both moved to Canada from Iran in 2015, wait to have their photo taken with dignitaries after becoming Canadian citizens during a special Canada Day citizenship ceremony, in West Vancouver on July 1, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Immigrants are worrying about social ties and finances during coronavirus

Immigrants and other newcomers to Canada are worried about maintaining their relationships and staying afloat, and need government consideration and support.
Syrian refugee family Mohammad Al Mnajer and wife Fouzia Al Hashish sit with their three daughters Judy, second left, Jaidaa, far right, and Baylasan as they eat their after school snack at their home in Mississauga, Ont., in December 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Immigrant children’s health declines rapidly after arrival in Canada

Research shows that many immigrants are healthier than Canadians when they arrive in the country. The longer they stay, the more their health declines.
Displaced children, like these in the Iraqi town of Qaraqosh, are remarkably resilient but not all thrive in their new countries. Here’s how we can help them. Joseph Galanakis/AAP

How we can help refugee kids to thrive in Australia

New research into the health of newly arrived refugee children in Australia gives us clues about how we can help all refugee kids.
Repeated trauma in childhood appears to change children’s enduring hormonal function and their subsequent brain development. sakhorn/Shutterstock

Here’s another reason kids don’t belong in detention: trauma changes growing brains

A bill that would release the 112 children currently in immigration detention in Australia will soon go before the House of Representatives. So what should MPs consider when casting their votes?
Deprivation and trauma and early childhood can affect the developing brain. Australian Human Rights Commission

Detained children risk life-long physical and mental harm

Many asylum seekers, including children, have experienced conflict, family separation and significant human rights violations. So how does immigration detention affect their mental health?
A drawing by a six-year-old child detained at the Christmas Island detention centre. AAP/AHRC

Report calls for royal commission into children in immigration detention: experts respond

The federal government has tabled the long-awaited Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) report into children held in immigration detention. The report, which recommends a royal commission be held…
Newly arrived refugees face many obstacles to making healthy food choices. Lucian/Flickr

Resettled refugees adopt Australia’s bad food habits

Refugees settling in Australia constantly face new challenges. They have to re-adjust to new income levels, cultural practices and language. They also face a new food environment, where many traditional…
Immigration secretary Martin Bowles has rejected the notion of any cover up by the department relating to children in detention centres. AAP/Joel Carrett

Immigration secretary denies departmental cover-up of asylum health stats

Immigration department secretary Martin Bowles has said his department was seeking advice about new data on the mental health problems of children in detention, not trying to cover it up. Bowles was responding…
Past failures cannot detract from the significance of documenting current abuses of children Stephen Mitchell

Back to the future: revisiting the treatment of child asylum seekers

The 1,000-plus children currently detained in immigration detention facilities in Australia and Nauru are at risk of serious mental health and developmental problems. The Human Rights Commission this week…

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