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Articles on Telemedicine

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The mifepristone pill is one option for medication abortion that can be purchased online and used at home. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

What is a medication, or medical, abortion? 5 questions answered by 3 doctors

Three experts answer questions about the effectiveness, safety and side effects of medication abortion, using mifepristone followed by misoprostol.
For decades, doctors and patients have used telemedicine. But it gained wider use when the COVID-19 pandemic led to canceled appointments and closed clinics. verbaska_studio/iStock via Getty Images Plus

COVID-19: Mental health telemedicine was off to a slow start – then the pandemic happened

By creating both an urgent need for mental health care and the need to prevent the spread of COVID-19, the pandemic is enabling telemedicine to go mainstream.
Removing ultrasound and pelvic exam requirements for medication abortion could help expand access to care. Oleg Rebrik/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Abortion pills are safe to prescribe without in-person exams, new research finds

During the pandemic, health care providers began prescribing abortion pills without requiring in-person exams. This practice could help people access the care they need when abortion rights are in limbo.
A key change in abortion care during the pandemic was that many providers offered some or all services via telemedicine. (Shutterstock)

How the COVID-19 pandemic has affected abortion care in Canada

Pandemic-related travel restrictions and facility closures initially jeopardized access to abortions, but the pandemic has also become a catalyst for more accessible ways to deliver abortion care.
Virtual care is a way to deliver health-care services using technology to remotely connect patients and health professionals. (Shutterstock)

Virtual care still has a place in post-pandemic health care

Given the success of telehealth and virtual care during the pandemic, it would be a mistake to automatically return to pre-pandemic norms of health care.
Given the observed and anticipated growth of telemedicine since the beginning of the pandemic, it would be a good idea to clarify and co-ordinate the rules applicable to it in Canada. Shutterstock

What the rise of telemedicine means for Canada’s legal system

The legal uncertainty surrounding telemedicine services is not without consequences. Patients may not have access to public protection remedies.
With more health resources devoted to COVID-19, non-COVID patients may have unmet health-care needs, which predict poorer health in the future. (Shutterstock)

Collateral damage: The unmet health-care needs of non-COVID-19 patients

With COVID-19 placing heavy demands on the health-care system, non-COVID patients may struggle to access care, putting women, people in poor health and those without a regular doctor at risk.
Amy Blais, a telehealth nurse at HomeHealth Visiting Nurses in Saco, Maine. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

How the old-fashioned telephone could become a new way for some to see their doctor

The old-fashioned telephone – well, maybe not a rotary dial, but a phone nonetheless – became a way during the pandemic for patients to ‘see’ their doctors. Could this trend continue?
The late Youssef Cohen moved from New York to Oregon in 2016 because of its aid-in-dying law. During the pandemic, assisted dying for terminal patients has gone online. John Moore/Getty Images

Dying virtually: Pandemic drives medically assisted deaths online

Terminally ill patients in nine states and Washington, DC can use telemedicine to get a doctor’s approval to hasten their end of life. But family members must mix the lethal drug cocktail themselves.

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