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Articles on US Supreme Court

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Football players from Lee Central High School in Bishopville, South Carolina, share a meal with players from the Robert E. Lee Academy. Lee County in South Carolina is still segregated. Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Pandemic school funding debate in South Carolina rekindles Jim Crow-era controversy

The battle to expand private education in South Carolina amid the pandemic mirrors previous struggles over civil rights and highlights the ways systemic racism has undermined public education.
Abortion rights demonstrators rally outside the Supreme Court in Washington on March 4, 2020. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin File)

If you’re pro-life, you might already be pro-choice

The death of U.S. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has re-ignited debates on the protection of reproductive rights. This might be the time to examine an overlooked inconsistency in the pro-life argument.
Demonstrators outside the U.S. Capitol on Sept. 21 called on the Republican-controlled Senate not to confirm a new justice until the next president is in office. Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Unlike US, Europe picks top judges with bipartisan approval to create ideologically balanced high courts

The Supreme Court doesn't have to be so polarized. Many European countries make judicial appointments in a term-limited, intentionally depoliticized way to promote consensus and compromise.
People gather outside the U.S. Supreme Court building as news spread of Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Sept. 18 death. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

3 ways a 6-3 Supreme Court would be different

A 6-3 conservative court will hear a broader range of controversial cases, shift interpretations of individual rights and put more pressure on local democracy to make policy decisions.
Michael Widomski, left, and David Hagedorn at the makeshift memorial for Justice Ginsburg in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on Sept. 20, 2020 in Washington, DC. Ginsburg officiated their wedding in 2013. Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Ginsburg’s legal victories for women led to landmark anti-discrimination rulings for the LGBTQ community, too

Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death sparked many tributes to her work ending sex discrimination against women. That work also paved the way for successes in the fight for equal rights for the LGBTQ community.
DACA supporters rally at the Supreme Court on Thursday, June 18, 2020, after the court rejected the Trump administration’s push to end DACA. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

It’s still a conservative Supreme Court, even after recent liberal decisions – here’s why

Those who say the Supreme Court's last term was a liberal success fail to understand that the types of decisions they see as victories are fleeting triumphs that will not endure.
A congressional staffer opens the boxes containing the Electoral College ballots in January 2017. Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call

Electoral College benefits whiter states, study shows

With a Supreme Court ruling rejecting one of the founders' two reasons for creating the Electoral College, only one reason remains: racism.
Delegates from 34 Native tribes at the Creek Council House in Indian Territory, now called Oklahoma, 1880. National Archives

Oklahoma is – and always has been – Native land

The Supreme Court's July 9 ruling that half of Oklahoma belongs to the Muscogee Nation confirms what Indigenous people already knew: North America is 'Indian Country.'
The eastern part of Oklahoma, about half of the state’s total land, was granted by Congress to Native American tribes in the 19th century, and is still under tribal sovereignty, the Supreme Court has ruled. Kmusser, based on 1890s data/Wikimedia Commons

Supreme Court upholds American Indian treaty promises, orders Oklahoma to follow federal law

Land in what is now eastern Oklahoma, which was granted to the Creek Nation by Congress in 1833, is still under tribal sovereignty, the Supreme Court ruled.

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