Articles on behavioural economics

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We don’t yet know how NDIS participants make trade-offs. Shutterstock

Why more investment in the NDIS may not boost employment

We don't actually know how NDIS participants weigh their personal goals and then make choices about achieving them through services, supports, therapies and interventions.
People take shelter during the floods in Mozambique. Antonio Silva/EPA

More people in Africa need to be insured against natural disasters

While disaster insurance would go a long way in averting losses, demand for cover is still lower than expected.
Employers can encourage employees to be more active through office design. Shutterstock

How employers can design workplaces to promote wellness

Research shows that corporate wellness programs don't really work. If companies want to boost employee health they should consider designing the workplace to encourage the right behaviour.
People don’t evaluate government policies through mathematical models or with long-term goals in mind. AAP/ Glenn Hunt

Treasury memo misses the real impact of Labor’s negative gearing policy

Treasury modelling suggests that limiting negative gearing will lead to small change in prices. But behavioural economics shows it all depends on how the policy is framed.
Richard Thaler, laureate in economics, receives his Nobel in Stockholm in December. TT News Agency/Jonas Ekstromer via Reuters

Behavioral economics finally goes mainstream: 4 essential reads

After two Nobel prize wins for behavioral economists, the burgeoning field has demonstrated its importance in shaping effective economic and government policy.
A product’s calorie label is a common form of nudging behavior. AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Do people like government ‘nudges’? Study says: Yes

Government initiatives to prod people to make better decisions got a lot of attention after Richard Thaler won a Nobel in economics for his working on nudging.
Office perks like slides down stairs may not be the best way to motivate good behaviour. Scott Beale/Flickr

The science of business decision making: giving out perks doesn’t necessarily lead to results

Business Briefing: the science of business decision making. The Conversation14.3 MB (download)
Research shows paying people more can actually lead to worse decisions. Getting the best results from executives requires understanding our complex motivations

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