Articles on Curriculum review

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Students in South Africa are tired of Western, Eurocentric university curricula. Reuters/Mike Hutchings

Decolonisation: academics must change what they teach, and how

More than two decades after apartheid ended, South African universities still tend to offer a view of the country and continent that is rooted in colonial and apartheid thinking.
The decolonisation of South Africa’s university curriculum seems to have fallen off the agenda, overtaken by the push for free higher education. Shutterstock

Decolonisation debate is a chance to rethink the role of universities

The decolonisation debate in South Africa's universities raises critical issues about the relationship between power, knowledge and learning.
A traditional rainmaker in Kenya. How can indigenous knowledge become part of university curricula? Department For International Development/International Development Research Centre/Thomas Omondi/Flickr

Decolonisation involves more than simply turning back the clock

Decolonisation of the curriculum doesn't have to mean the destruction of Western knowledge, but it's decentring. Such knowledge should become one way of knowing rather than the only way.
Students cheer as a statue of Cecil John Rhodes is removed from the University of Cape Town in April 2015. REUTERS/Sumaya Hisham

Decolonising the curriculum: it’s time for a strategy

There is a risk that because of fatigue, frustration and silencing the important moment created by South Africa's student movements will pass by with no proper, long-term structural change.
Students want colonial symbols, such as this statue of Cecil John Rhodes, gone from their universities. EPA/Nic Bothma

Decolonising universities isn’t an easy process – but it has to happen

Calls for the decolonisation of countries, institutions, the mind and of knowledge are not new. In South Africa, these changes are crucial and long overdue. But they must be carefully thought through.
Taking the curriculum “back to basics” will disadvantage kids who perhaps don’t have access to cultural and other knowledge at home. AAP/Tim Dornin

We lose more than we gain by paring back the curriculum

We run a significant risk that the divide between the haves and have-nots will widen even further through the "back to basics" curriculum approach advocated by Education Minister Pyne.
A separate curriculum for students with disability would be discriminatory and go against the research. Shutterstock

Separate curriculum for students with disability no good for anyone

The review of the Australian curriculum raises major concerns about access to a quality curriculum for students with disability. Under the guise of creating greater inclusivity, the review recommends a…
The reviewers say the Australian Curriculum doesn’t have enough emphasis on our Judeo-Christian heritage and Western influence. What do the experts say? AAP

National curriculum review: experts respond

The much awaited review of the National Curriculum has finally been released with the reviewers calling for more of a focus on Western literature, and recognition of Australia’s “Judeo-Christian” heritage…

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