Articles on Long read

Displaying 1 - 20 of 72 articles

The Supreme Court’s decision in the Trinity Lutheran case is blurring the lines between church and state. aradaphotography/Shutterstock.com

The Supreme Court, religion and the future of school choice

The Trinity Lutheran case signals the Supreme Court's willingness to interpret separation of church and state as religious discrimination. What will this mean for the future of vouchers and school choice?
Spanish flu killed more people than the Great War that preceded it. And tuberculosis even more than that. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Four of the most lethal infectious diseases of our time and how we’re overcoming them

Here we explore our past and present struggles with four of the most significant infectious diseases human beings have faced, and some of the progress we've made in prevention and treatment.
Inmates at the California Institution for Men state prison in Chino, California in 2011. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

What’s hidden behind the walls of America’s prisons

The University of Michigan's Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Heather Ann Thompson explains why Americans must demand better access to the nation's prisons.
A hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease is gradual deterioration of memory. Roman Kraft/Unsplash

What causes Alzheimer’s disease? What we know, don’t know and suspect

Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia, but treatments are still far from successful in clinical trials. Here is what we know about the disease, and what is yet to be uncovered.
Stories in the media are often the first or even the only way that people hear about science and medical news. So we need to get the reporting right. from www.shutterstock.com

Essays on health: reporting medical news is too important to mess up

Health reporting requires asking the right questions and doing quality research. But specialist skills are also handy, especially when it comes to knowing the language and processes of science.
Proper nutrition is critical to combatting the costly and deadly epidemics of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. from www.shutterstock.com

Essays on health: how food companies can sneak bias into scientific research

Food, drug and other companies often sponsor research in the hope it might produce results favourable to their products. How can we ensure such research remains independent?
Gurindji ranger Ursula Chubb pays her respects to ancestors killed in the early 1900s at Blackfella Creek, where children were tied with wire and dragged by horses, and adults were shot as they fled. They were buried under rocks where they fell. Brenda L Croft, from Yijarni

Friday essay: the untold story behind the 1966 Wave Hill Walk-Off

The Gurindji people of the Northern Territory made history 50 years ago by standing up for their rights to land and better pay. But a new book reveals the deeper story behind the Wave Hill Walk-Off.
Aboriginal elder Max Eulo holds a baby in front of a sea of 70,000 multi-coloured paper hands at the Sydney Opera House in December 2000. David Gray/Reuters

Friday essay: reflections on the idea of a common humanity

Racism is again on the rise in many parts of the world. So is the dehumanisation of our enemies. What hope is there, then, for notions of a common humanity?

Top contributors

More