Articles on Walking

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Only in a few active travel strongholds, typically in the inner city, do Australian cycling and walking rates get close to those in Europe. Andrew Robinson/Flickr

Australian cities are far from being meccas for walking and cycling

A comparison of Australian cities reveals cyclists and walkers are still very much a minority of commuters, despite the economic, health and environmental costs. Action on three fronts is needed.
Do not be derailed by news reports that exercise is bad for the heart. Taking more exercise is a New Year’s resolution to stick to. Exercise reduces risks of depression, cancers, heart disease, stroke and sudden death. (Shutterstock)

Exercise more in 2018 – it really is good for your heart

Taking more exercise is a New Year's resolution to stick to. Exercise reduces risks of depression, cancers, heart disease, stroke and sudden death.
It’s important to young Australians to be able to walk and feel safe while doing so. Victoria Walks ©

Young people want walkable neighbourhoods, but safety is a worry

The benefits of walking are widely promoted, but most Australian communities still aren't walker-friendly. Young people, who rely heavily on walking to get around, are clear about what has to change.
A man taking stairs at Washington-Dulles International Airport in 2013. Wikimedia Commons

One step at a time: Simple nudges can increase lifestyle physical activity

Dropping old, bad habits is hard, but starting new, good ones may not be so difficult. Or so a recent study suggests. Read how a simple sign at an airport made a difference.
In Melbourne, Adelaide and Sydney, just over a third of dwellings are within 400 metres of a public transport stop with services every 30 minutes, but the proportions are much lower in other cities. Angela Brkic/AAP

City-by-city analysis shows our capitals aren’t liveable for many residents

Governments, developers and urban planners all aspire to create liveable cities. Yet when it comes to Australian cities, the rhetoric and reality don’t quite match.
Staying physically active can play a big part in ageing well – and a well-designed neighbourhood helps with that. Maylat/shutterstock

Eight simple changes to our neighbourhoods can help us age well

Our ageing population presents several social and economic challenges, particularly for the health sector. Physical activity can tackle many of these.
We make judgements of people by the way they move, even when we can’t see their facial features. Flickr/Giuseppe Milo

Friend or foe? Just look at the way a person moves

The way people move can give us a heads up on their mood or intention: it's called biological motion. Technology called 'point light displays' is helping narrow down what unique movements imply.
Walking is free, easy and can get you from A to B - but does it “count” in terms of how much exercise we need? from

Health Check: in terms of exercise, is walking enough?

Fitness, strength and mobility are important for us to live happy and healthy lives, how much does walking improve these measures?
A stroll through Sydney’s Marks Park and the nearby tourist attraction Sculptures by the Sea is a different experience if one knows the area’s brutal history. Leah-Anne Thompson from

Psychogeography: a way to delve into the soul of a city

Wandering the city by foot helps us look beneath ordinary conceptions of the face value of a place to the meanings built up and lost over time.
Customers who arrive on foot, by bicycle or by public transport contribute significantly more to the restaurant trade than the business owners realise. Mik Scheper/flickr

Parking isn’t as important for restaurants as the owners think it is

A new study shows that restaurateurs would be better off advocating for better public transport access to their precincts rather than for more parking.

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