Articles on Antibiotic resistance

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A quantum dot: A high-resolution transmission electron micrograph of cadmium telluride nanoparticles. (The scale bar in the lower right is 2 nanometers long, or two millionths of a millimeter.) Nagpal Group, University of Colorado

Fighting superbugs with nanotechnology and light

Quantum dots - minuscule semiconductor particles with specific light-absorption properties - can kill drug-resistant superbugs without harming the surrounding healthy tissue.
Antibiotic resistance is growing. www.shutterstock.com

Is the antibiotic apocalypse nigh?

Researchers in China have found strains of E.coli that are resistant colistin, the antibiotic of last resort.
A pharmacist dispensing drugs at Nairobi’s Mater Hospital. Resistance to antibiotics is high in Africa. Reuters/Thomas Mukoya

Africa has a long way to go to close the gap on antibiotic resistance

Antibiotics are used extensively in Africa because of the continent's high disease burden. This also means that resistance is high. Steps are being taken to raise awareness and encourage prudent use.
The more we take antibiotics, the more likely we are to have superbugs down the line. Brandice Schnabel/Flickr

When should you take antibiotics?

Antibiotics can prevent serious harm and stop infections becoming fatal. But they won't kill common cold and flu viruses, and careless overprescribing by doctors can do more harm than good.
Tests on mice have shown certain antibiotic-resistant gut bacteria can be treated with faecal transplants. Rick Eh/flickr

Poo transplants can eliminate two superbugs from the gut: mice study

Two of the most common antibiotic-resistant bacteria circulating in hospitals can be wiped out by transplanting faeces from a healthy animal into the gut of an infected one, a study on mice has found.
Silver can be an effective antibacterial when treated in special ways. Silver image via www.shutterstock.com.

Silver shines as antibacterial for medical implants

Joint replacement surgery comes with a big risk of infection. New implant technology that can release silver ions inside the body could help – and without increasing antibiotic resistance.

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