Drought

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Flooding in Houston, April 18, 2016. Laurence Simon/Flickr

Has climate change really improved U.S. weather?

Extreme weather has an outsized impact on everyday life. Focusing on average weather patterns may make Americans dangerously complacent about how climate change is already affecting our lives.
Data about farms' financial situation as well as the weather could help identify those most vulnerable to drought. Bidgee/Wikimedia Commons

Drought forecasting isn’t just about water – to get smart we need health and financial data too

Forecasting drought should be about more than weather – to help those likely to be hit hardest, we need financial and even health data too.
Mozambique needs to prioritise labour-intensive sectors, including agriculture. Reuters/file picture

How Mozambique can avoid stepping into the abyss

Economic growth forecasts for Mozambique are being revised down. The country needs to safeguard economic stability by taking steps to break with the past.
Extreme weather could trigger ecosystem collapse, including mass tree deaths. Dead tree image from www.shutterstock.com

Rising extreme weather warns of ecosystem collapse: study

Extreme weather will affect people and animals, as well as whole ecosystems. Research using satellites shows that ecosystems worldwide are vulnerable to collapse.
South Africa’s Jacob Zuma is president of the country as well as the African National Congress. He is under pressure on all fronts. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

Does President Zuma have the courage to do the right thing?

It is unlikely President Zuma will announce a structural changes in his State of the Nation Address. This, despite education being in dire need of fundamental restructuring and an economy in decline.
CSIRO has contributed to surprising discoveries in climate science. Pictured here is the research ship RV Investigator. AAP Image/University of Tasmania

CSIRO cuts to climate science are against the public good

CSIRO's climate science has contributed a number of important, and unexpected, findings.
Rural southern Australia has been drying out over the past several decades. Pictured here, Burra in South Australia. David Jones

Hasta la vista El Niño – but don’t hold out for ‘normal’ weather just yet

Australia is the land of drought of flooding rains, driven by events such as El Nino. But despite this variability, some parts of Australia are clearly drying out.
Maize is a staple food in South Africa. Its production is likely to decline by half this year due to drought. The poor will be the hardest hit. Shutterstock

South Africa’s poor face rising food prices as drought intensifies

South Africa has been hit by a severe drought and will not be able to produce enough maize - its staple food - in 2016. This will prompt a rise in imports and therefore food prices.
A hot end of the year contributed to Christmas Day fires in Victoria. AAP Image/Keith Pakenham

Australia’s climate in 2015: cool to start with a hot finish

El Niño dominated global climate in 2015, but in Australia the story was more complicated. 2015 was Australia's fifth warmest year on record, and saw the return of very dry conditions to parts of Australia.
Despite a decade of drought and declining rainfall in parts of Australia, there’s still plenty of water to go around. Maroondah reservoir from www.shutterstock.com

Declining rainfall in parts of Australia, but still plenty of water available: BOM report

The Millennium Drought ended more than five years ago, but several years of below-average rainfall and El Niño have brought drought back to many parts of Australia. Our latest report on water in Australia shows rainfall is continuing to decline in eastern Australia and increase in the north.

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