Articles on Newspapers

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New research shows Muslims are more negatively portrayed in the media than other groups. AAP/Lukas Coch

Racist reporting still rife in Australian media

New research reveals that about half of opinion pieces in mainstream newspapers and television are so racist they potentially breach industry codes of conduct.
Canadians often mourn the loss of their local newspaper. But there’s a disconnect, because few Canadians actually pay for a local news subscription. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward)

Instead of mourning local news, try paying for it

The love Canadians profess for their local newspapers isn't quite what it seems. Few pay for a subscription, and many say they can get their news elsewhere if their local paper shuts down.
Political reporter William D. Workman speaks at a GOP event in 1962. Courtesy of South Carolina Political Collections, University of South Carolina

Before Breitbart, there was the Charleston News and Courier

In the 1960s, white newspaper journalists exploited racial divisions to help build the GOP's southern firewall.
Businessman and philanthropist Joe Ricketts shut down DNAinfo and Gothamist after his workers voted to unionize. Dave Weaver/AP Photo

In an era of billionaire media moguls, do press unions stand a chance?

Joe Ricketts abruptly shut down DNAinfo and Gothamist after his employees voted to unionize. Is what he did legal? And how could similar events be prevented in the future?
Ralph Northam, Democrat of Virginia, has cruised to a comfortable victory over his Republican rival. But you wouldn’t have predicted that based on Virginia’s newspaper endorsements. Aaron Bernstein/Reuters

Northam win in Virginia shows why newspapers should stop endorsing candidates

It's time for newspapers to stop telling their dwindling number of subscribers how to vote.
A unique collaborative journalism project revealed industry and government officials in Saskatchewan were aware of significant public safety hazards from potentially deadly hydrogen sulphide gas. (Michael Wrobel/NSIRN)

Can new models of public interest journalism survive?

Canadian newspapers are in trouble, and there are no philanthropic efforts afoot to rescue them. The National Student Investigative Reporting Network, or NSIRN, is aiming to make a difference.
A recent research project about the 2015 Canadian election showed social media is no substitute for local news coverage. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Peter Power

When a squirrel dies: The rapid decline of local news

Local news is as important to communities as clean air, but the failing business model of traditional journalism has left the local news industry in rapid decline.
Laurene Powell Jobs, founder and chair of the Emerson Collective. Gus Ruelas/Reuters

The slippery slope of the oligarchy media model

There are some benefits to the uptick in billionaire newspaper and magazine owners, who can weather short-term losses for the sake of long-term gains. But whose interests are really being served?
A wonderful evocation of the horrors of last year’s long election campaign by David Rowe in the Australian Financial Review. Amid industry turmoil, newspaper cartooning is increasingly becoming a niche activity.

Friday essay: political cartooning – the end of an era

One of the great satirical achievements of the mass media era, the editorial cartoon, is losing its centrality in the digital age. Yet the 'visual terrorism' of cartoons can cut through the verbiage of political commentary.
Back in the 1930s, people like this pear peddler in New York City’s Lower East Side often got their news from labor-led media. AP Photo

The backstory behind the unions that bought a Chicago Sun-Times stake

The newspaper's new owners harken back to a tradition of labor-led media in the early part of the 20th century, which represented a bulwark against corporate power.
This photograph taken in Paris Friday Dec. 2, 2016 shows stories from USA Daily News 24, a fake news site registered in Veles, Macedonia. USA Daily News 24 is one of roughly 200 U.S.-oriented sites registered in Veles. Both stories shown here are bogus. (AP Photo/Raphael Satter)

The real consequences of fake news

News consumers don't often believe fake news. But it's nonetheless critical that they learn to gauge the legitimacy of news sources and become aware of their own biases.
Edward Jenner, who pioneered vaccination, and two colleagues (right) seeing off three anti-vaccination opponents, with the dead lying at their feet (1808). I Cruikshank/Wellcome Images/Wikimedia Commons

A short history of vaccine objection, vaccine cults and conspiracy theories

Some people have objected to childhood vaccination since it was introduced in the late 1700s. And their reasons sound remarkably familiar to those of anti-vaxxers today.
The New York Times continues to invest in its newsrooms and expand internationally (it has journalists filing stories from over 150 countries), while Fairfax continues to chop newsroom jobs. Elaine To/AAP

Time for a ‘digital’ reality check on Fairfax and The New York Times

While digital revenue streams may be delivering, there's still a strong reliance on print for revenue and research shows readers engage more with print.

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