Weather

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The large 1982 El Niño contributed to the Ash Wednesday bushfires that killed 75 people in south east Australia. Sydney Oats/Wikimedia

Odds keep rising for a big El Niño in 2015

El Niño has arrived, it's getting stronger, and it's not about to go away soon. And already there are rumblings that this could be a big one.
Breaking the ice: while scientists increasingly understand why Antarctic sea ice is growing, it remains tricky to forecast. Australian Antarctic Division

Expanding sea ice is causing headaches for Antarctic stations

Antarctica's sea ice is changing in ways that scientists didn't predict, and is now causing headaches for Antarctic stations.
Clumps of thunderstorms are driving increases in rain over tropical oceans. Image courtesy of the Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit, NASA Johnson Space Center

The tropics are getting wetter: the reason could be clumpy storms

For a long time climate models have forecast increasing rainfall in tropics. Now we know part of the reason: clumpy thunderstorms.
Surging tides from Cyclone Marcia hit Main Beach in Yeppoon, Queensland, with the storm packing wind gusts close to 300 kilometres an hour. AAP Image/Karin Calvert

The role of social media as cyclones batter Australia

Emergency services are using social media to help spread warnings as two tropical cyclones batter Australia. It can also help them with relief efforts once the worst of the severe weather has passed.
Sometimes you don’t need a measuring stick to come up with an assessment: really, really deep. katorisi

Where do those snowfall totals on the nightly news come from?

The Blue Hill Observatory, a few miles south of Boston, recently recorded the deepest snow cover in their 130-year history, an incredible 46 inches. Earlier this month, Bangor, Maine tied their own record…
Despite adjustments to temperature data in the Arctic, the overall global warming trend remains the same. Flickr/P J Hansen

Global warming trend unaffected by ‘fiddling’ with temperature data

Attacks on institutions that keep records of global temperatures, such as NASA, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the UK Met Office, and Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology, continue…

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