Articles on Flooding

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Searching for victims after a rain-triggered mudslide that blanketed a village and killed at least 178 people in north China’s Shanxi province, Sept. 13, 2008. AP Photo/Andy Wong

Global toll from landslides is heaviest in developing countries

While the Montecito, California mudslides took 20 lives, landslides kill far more people in developing countries. Tighter construction standards and early warning systems could help reduce their toll.
If more people live in the Adelaide Hills, they are more likely to be exposed to bushfires. David Mariuz/AAP

Natural hazard risk: is it just going to get worse or can we do something about it?

What decisions can we make today to reduce the future risk of hazards like floods and fire? Particularly in a time of climate change, modelling various plausible futures helps us plan for uncertainty.
A woman takes an oral cholera vaccine in a hospital. But cholera vaccines are not always effective and never long lasting. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares

What’s driving multiple outbreaks of cholera in Nigeria

Many states in Nigeria are reeling from cholera outbreaks. They need better health and sanitation infrastructure to disrupt transmission of the bacteria which cause the disease.
Satellite image on Sept. 7, 2017 shows three hurricanes: Irma in the center just north of the island of Hispaniola, Katia on the left in the Gulf of Mexico and Jose in the Atlantic Ocean on the right. NOAA via AP

Do hurricanes feel the effects of climate change?

What scientists know – and don't know – about the linkage between climate change and hurricanes.
Damage from Irma can be seen in this photo of Kelly McClenthen in Bonita Springs, Florida, as she returned to her home Sept. 11, 2017. AP Photo/Gerald Herbert

What do hospitals do in a hurricane? Use their own emergency plans

Even in areas predicted to take direct hits from hurricanes and other storms, hospitals must do all they can to stay open. It isn't an easy task, but preparation and practice help.
Relatively few homes hit by Harvey have flood insurance. Reuters/Carlo Allegri

How flood insurance works: 6 questions answered

The federal government created a program in 1968 to insure homes in the US from flooding, yet few of the houses hammered by Harvey's record rainfall were covered.
Residents pick through a makeshift aid station in Rockport, Texas after Harvey struck their city. AP Photo/Eric Gay

Stretching your donation dollars: 5 tips

The desire to help during emergencies like Hurricane Harvey is admirable. With a little homework, your contributions will go further.
Houston’s Interstate Highway 45 was totally submerged in the deluge. REUTERS/Richard Carson

Is Hurricane Harvey a harbinger for Houston’s future?

The unpredictability of hurricanes makes it hard to say for sure whether climate change is making them worse. But we do know that sea-level rise and increased evaporation will worsen the impacts.
The Acros Fukuoka eco-building in Fukuoka, Japan boasts one of the world’s most famous green roofs. The GRIT Lab at the University of Toronto is working to bring green roofs to the city and beyond in order to combat climate change. (Shutterstock)

How green roofs can protect city streets from flooding

Green roofs could play a critical role in helping cities cope with extreme rainfall events in the age of climate change. The roofs essentially suck up stormwater like sponges if designed properly.

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