Articles sur Biomimicry

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A kingfisher’s beak inspired the design of high-speed trains in Japan, through the process of ‘biomimicry,’ or human imitation of nature. (Shutterstock)

How modern technology is inspired by the natural world

From kingfishers to dandelion seeds and bone tissue, natural organisms are the source of many radical human innovations in technology and medicine.
Budgies in flight – how come they don’t crash into each other? Flickr/Jim Bendon

Bird brains may help drones fly and avoid crashing

Imagine a sky full of autonomous flying machines delivering anything from fast-food to important documents, medical supplies or just a surprise gift for someone special. How do you stop them all colliding…
Inspired by Alpine seeds that stuck to dog fur. Alexander Klink

Nature must remain at the heart of engineering solutions

Last week, David Taylor of Trinity College Dublin argued that simply copying nature is no way to succeed at inventing. His main point is valid – there are indeed not many chances for engineers to make…
The lyrebird courtship display involves dancing and mimicry. David Cook/Flickr

Lyrebirds mimicking chainsaws: fact or lie?

The lyrebird is considered one of Australia’s best-known birds — you might recognise them from our 10 cent coin — but do we really know them? Famed for their spectacular courtship display, you may have…

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