Articles sur Cancer treatment

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Smoking is the biggest cause of preventable death in the U.S. A test for long-time smokers might be able to detect lung cancer earlier, thereby saving lives. Lightspring/Shutterstock.com

The test that could save the life of a long-time smoker you know

Low-dose CT scans can detect lung cancer in smokers and former smokers at an early and sometimes treatable stage. Why are so few smokers and former smokers getting them?
Having cancer is bad enough, and dealing with the costs and confusion of billing systems makes things harder. KieferPix/Shutterstock.com

Confusing and high bills for cancer patients add to anxiety and suffering

A cancer diagnosis is one of the scariest of all. The pain and fear are worsened by a confusing landscape of bills, opaque billing systems and changing insurance rules, rates and reimbursements.
There are lots of ways to support a friend through breast cancer. Sharing the journey is key, studies suggest. Rawpixel.com/Shutterstock

What kind of support do breast cancer patients want? Food, rides and prayer

People across the country show their support for breast cancer patients and survivors by wearing pink and raising money each October. A recent study of patients suggests ways to help all year.
Cancer care for adults could be improved if caregivers provided the empathy they provide to children, the authors suggest. ESB Professional/Shutterstock.com

How lessons from childhood cancer care could improve adult cancer care

Pediatric cancer is one of the cruelest of diseases, and caregivers develop special skills to help their patients. Research shows that caregivers for adults could learn some things from them.
We only know if a cancer has been cured in hindsight. Photo by Kaylee Eden on Unsplash

My cancer is in remission – does this mean I’m cured?

A cancer is in remission when it can no longer be detected. But we only say it's cured when it hasn't come back for a certain time – and that differs for different cancers.
In this Dec. 3, 2014 photo, liver cancer patient Crispin Lopez Serrano talks to an oncology nurse at a hospital in Clackamas, Ore. AP Photo/Gosia Wozniacka

How kindness can make a difference in cancer care

Great strides have been made in cancer medicine over decades, but it's important not to forget the growing role that kindness and empathy play in good care.
Applications to list drugs on the PBS are usually submitted by the manufacturers of those drugs. from shutterstock.com

We don’t need to change how we subsidise ‘breakthrough’ cancer treatments

Some argue the current system of subsidising drugs in Australia needs changing to accommodate new cancer therapies. But two recent drug listings show the current system is working perfectly well.
All brain tumours are associated with significant sickness and death, even if they are benign. from shutterstock.com

Three charts on: brain cancer in Australia

Why hasn't there been an improvement in survival in the last 30 years for patients with brain cancers?
African-American women are about three times more likely to be diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease. mangostock/Shutterstock.com

A new clue into treatments for triple negative breast cancer, a mean disease

Researchers have long been looking for clues into how to treat triple negative breast cancer. Could fighter blood cells that infiltrate the tumor provide insight?
Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) flanked by Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-La.), left, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) as they addressed the unpopularity of their replacement bill. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

How Obamacare has helped poor cancer patients

Poor people who have cancer are one of the most financially vulnerable groups in the US. Obamacare aimed to improve their access to care. A recent study shows how it did.
Singers from the New York City Gay Men’s Choir sing Dec. 1, 2015 at the Apollo Theater in New York for World AIDS Day. A new health foe has emerged among gay and bisexual men. AP Photo/Seth Wenig

How the anal cancer epidemic in gay and bi HIV-positive men can be prevented

A new study shows that anal cancer, caused by the virus HPV, can be successfully fought in HIV-positive men by timely treatment and HPV vaccination of lesions that may ultimately lead to cancer.
Some people taking these drugs can see their cancer completely disappear – there’s nothing left to see on their x-rays. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Cancer immunotherapy drugs like Keytruda and Opdivo hold hope for some, but there’s still a way to go

Imagine being able to offer hope to people with cancers once thought untreatable. Checkpoint immune drugs like Opdivo and Keytruda lead this new era in treatment. But they don't work for everyone.

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