Articles sur Cities & Policy

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How much of co-housing is shared space is up to residents.

Co-housing works well for older people, once they get past the image problem

Older Australians are keenly aware of the housing challenges they face, but most are wary of co-housing due to the negative associations of shared living spaces.
A stroll through Sydney’s Marks Park and the nearby tourist attraction Sculptures by the Sea is a different experience if one knows the area’s brutal history. Leah-Anne Thompson from www.shutterstock.com

Psychogeography: a way to delve into the soul of a city

Wandering the city by foot helps us look beneath ordinary conceptions of the face value of a place to the meanings built up and lost over time.
The closure of the Gatwick Hotel means those most in need of shelter have lost another place they could stay. Darkydoors from www.shutterstock.com

Goodbye to the Gatwick, and to so much of the old St Kilda

When wealth accumulation becomes the driver of urban regeneration, residents who already have little or no say in the future of our cities are further marginalised by gentrification.
Our land-title system originated in the mid-19th century when Sir Robert Richard Torrens campaigned to reform Adelaide’s chaotic deeds-based land system. National Library of Australia

Torrens, our land-title pioneer, might have approved of privatised registries

Sir Robert Richard Torrens – the man behind Australia’s 'Torrens system' of land-title registration – was an economic liberal who might have approved of privatising title registries.
How truly innovative are companies like Uber and Airbnb, super-monopolies that capture entire markets by locking vendors and customers into their platforms? Dan Peled/AAP

In defence of serendipity: the Silicon Emperor is wearing no clothes

The digital pin-ups' business models actually inhibit serendipity and, indeed, innovation by absorbing entire markets into the sealed-off space of their platforms.
When the smart city looks inhuman: a robot police officer from Dubai greets guests at last November’s Smart City Expo World Congress in Barcelona. Ramon Costa/AAP

Creative city, smart city … whose city is it?

The corporate world has taken the lead in promoting various creative/smart city visions, which struggle to be inclusive, let alone entrust citizens with control over their lives.
Bicycles are the main form of transport around the Burning Man Festival and are recycled or gifted afterwards. stuartlchambers/flickr

There’s a city in my mind …

The annual Burning Man Festival creates a temporary city in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert. In many ways, it's an innovation lab for rethinking cities.
Sydney’s bus services are a mix of public and private-operated routes, which complicates any estimates of potential cost savings. Dean Lewins/AAP

Why touted public transport savings from competitive tendering are too high

Estimated cost savings for rail and bus franchising from Infrastructure Australia and PwC will have government treasurers salivating. Problem is, the figures are almost certainly far too high.
The national broadband network promised by the incoming Rudd government was politicised from the start. Lukas Coch/AAP

The NBN: how a national infrastructure dream fell short

The highly politicised nature of the NBN has led to a lack of transparency that makes it even harder to fix the mess that has been made of this vital national infrastructure.
Most Sydneysiders are concerned about the effects of foreign investment on the local real estate market. Dave Hunt/AAP

Sydneysiders blame foreign investors for high housing prices – survey

Only 18% of Sydneysiders think foreign investors should be able to buy property. They simply don't accept arguments that this investment improves housing affordability by increasing supply.
Sydneysiders’ view of their city’s liveability is very different depending on whether they live in the east or west. Sam Mooy/AAP

‘Liveable’ Sydney has clear winners and losers

Justifying Sydney’s ranking as a liveable city requires greater recognition of the inequality of Sydneysiders' access to jobs, wealth, transport and housing.

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