Articles sur Genome

Affichage de 1 à 20 de 38 articles

Do we contain the most elaborate set of instructions? Genome image via www.shutterstock.com.

How many genes does it take to make a person?

The answer – fewer than are in a banana – has implications for the study of human health and raises questions about what generates complexity anyway.
Pipette tips with reaction mixture to amplify DNA. anyaivanova/www.shutterstock.com

Should we edit out genetic disease?

It seems like a no brainer to edit out genetic disease...until we pause to consider what would be lost.
Slowly giving up its secrets. www.shutterstock.com

Is schizophrenia written in our genes?

Many of the genes and transcripts associated with schizophrenia are only found in humans, which makes studying the disorder difficult. But scientists are slowly making progress.
It’s a lot for a person to puzzle out… call in the computers! Shaury Nash

How computers help biologists crack life’s secrets

Modern biological research relies on big data analytics. Vast reservoirs of memory and powerful computing ability mean machines find patterns and make meta-analyses and even predictions for scientists.
Understanding the DNA of tumours allows researchers to target treatment to each individual. Erika/Flickr

How cancer doctors use personalised medicine to target variations unique to each tumour

Personalised medicine is based on the idea that by understanding the specific molecular code of a person’s disease, and particularly its genetic makeup, we can more accurately tailor treatment.
Australia’s Federal Court last year rejected Ms D'Arcy’s appeal and ruled companies could patent genes they isolated. Dan Peled/Shutterstock

Remind me again, how can companies patent breast cancer genes?

The High Court challenge is the last resort for Ms D'Arcy's test case against companies patenting human genes and has implications for patients, clinicians and researchers.
Epigenetic molecules play a different melody on different people’s genomes, and this might be contributing to some developing autism. Jesse Kruger/Flickr

Music of the genome hits a discord with autism

The epigenetic 'musicians' that play our genomes in different ways might help us understand the causes of autism.

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