Articles sur Justice

Affichage de 1 à 20 de 127 articles

How do survivors find healing? Chum Mey, a survivor of the Khmer Rouge regime, walks past a portrait of Nuon Chea, a former Khmer Rouge leader. AP Photo/Heng Sinith

Bearing witness to Cambodia’s horror, 20 years after Pol Pot’s death

The accounts of survivors of Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge show how they were able to find justice and healing by breaking their silence and speaking on behalf of those who were killed.
Six memorial candles are lit during a Holocaust Remembrance Day ceremony at Sharkey Theater on board Naval Station Pearl Harbor. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class James E. Foehl

Why remembering matters for healing

Remembrance days and memorials provide people the opportunity to share stories with a community. An expert explains how that can make a difference.
Australian governments have too often succumbed to perceived community pressure to limit parole authorities’ independence and powers. AAP/Samantha Manchee

Political interventions have undermined the parole system’s effectiveness and independence

Government and judicial interventions into the decisions of parole boards display a progressive loss of faith in these independent bodies.
In a 2016 ABS survey, one in two women reported having experienced sexual harassment, but 90% of them did not contact the police. Cindy Zhi/The Conversation NY-BD-CC

#MeToo exposes legal failures, but ‘trial by Twitter’ isn’t one of them

Critics say that #MeToo has turned the legal principle of innocent until proven guilty on its head, but such comments privilege the rights of perpetrators over justice for victims.
Colten Boushie’s uncle Alvin Baptiste raises an eagle’s wing as demonstrators gather outside of the courthouse in North Battleford, Sask., on Saturday, Feb. 10, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Matt Smith

The myth of the Wheat King and the killing of Colten Boushie

In the acquittal of Gerald Stanley we must remember how one-sided systematic remembering in Canada has been. We must remember how Canadian-state law created the myth of the homesteader as Wheat King.
This sculpture in London commemorates Nelson Mandela, who set up the African National Congress’ armed wing, Umkhonto we Sizwe (Spear of the Nation), in 1961 when he lost hope that passive and non-violent resistance to the apartheid government would bear fruit. (Creative Commons)

Why conflict can be necessary to bring about justice

Seeking justice, not peace, in our world changes the conversation about conflict. Conflict has proven integral to achieving a more equitable and secure society.
For all offences in the higher courts, the proportion of Victorians sent to prison is actually higher than the national average. AAP/Paul Miller

Is Victoria’s sentencing regime really more lenient?

An overriding focus on increasing sentences may not necessarily be the best means of redressing the harm caused by sex offences.

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