Articles sur Marine life

Affichage de 41 à 60 de 70 articles

A typical elephant shark from the Melbourne Aquarium. Wikimedia/Fir0002/Flagstaffotos

Avoiding Medusa’s gaze: what sharks can tell us about a rare human disease

Some things that develop as normal in elephant sharks and other marine life can mimic things we see in human disease. That makes these 'mutants' ideal for study to find out why things go wrong in humans.
Tuna and other top predators could run out of food in warming seas. Tuna image from www.shutterstock.com

The oceans are changing too fast for marine life to keep up

Over the past five years we've seen a significant increase in research on ocean acidification and warming seas, and their effect on marine life. Overall, unfortunately, the news is not good.
This common lionfish (Pterois volitans) was sighted more than 200km further south than expected down the NSW coast by 14-year-old scuba diver Georgia Poyner. It’s one of almost 40 verified observations she has submitted to Redmap. Redmap/Georgia Poyner

How you can help scientists track how marine life reacts to climate change

We know the warming seas are forcing some marine life to new waters, but we don't know much about how fast and how far they are moving. But now you can help scientists find the answers with Redmap.
The Great Southern Reef is unique, beautiful and contributes significantly to Australia’s culture and economy. However, few of us realise the magnitude and value of this gem right at our doorstep. T. Wernberg 2002

Australia’s ‘other’ reef is worth more than $10 billion a year - but have you heard of it?

The Great Southern Reef covers 71,000 square km and contributes more than A$10 billion to Australia's economy each year.
A green turtle hatches in the lab. David Pike

Rising seas could drown turtle eggs: new research

Immersion in seawater kills sea turtle eggs, suggesting that sea turtles are increasingly at risk from rising seas, according to research published today in Royal Society Open Science.
Icy waters off the western Antarctic Peninsula. Kathryn Smith

The march of the king crabs: a warning from Antarctica

Hundreds of meters below the surface of the freezing ocean surrounding Antarctica, the seafloor is teeming with life. The animals living there have no idea that an army is on the brink of invading their tranquil environment.
The cycles of nutrients into the oceans following the building of mountains may have been a prime driver of evolutionary change. John Long, Flinders University

Plate tectonics may have driven the evolution of life on Earth

The rise and fall of the essential elements for life could have influenced the way life evolved over many millions of years.
The tropical orange blotch surgeon fish has been moving south into New South Wales. Graham Edgar / Reef Life Survey

Following Nemo: marine life is heading south

As warmer seas move further south, tropical wildlife is going with them, giving us a dramatic insight into how global warming is changing our oceans.
A US Coast Guard icebreaker cuts a swathe through the icy the Southern Ocean earlier this year, on its way to rendezvous with a stricken fishing vessel. Allyson Conroy/US Coast Guard/Wikimedia Commons

35 years on, is the deal to protect Antarctica’s oceans working?

On the eve of a summit in Chile to discuss the protection of marine life in Antarctic waters, much still needs to be done to guard against overfishing, climate change and other threats.
Kelp covered landscape in Western Australia. Dan Smale

Marine heatwaves threaten the future of underwater forests

Western Australia’s marine environment is unique. Two world heritage areas, the largest fringing coral reef in Australia, and more than a thousand kilometres of underwater forests, supporting incredible…
Phytoplankton are responsible for half the world’s productivity. Here, a phytoplankton bloom in the northern Pacific. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Flickr

Tiny marine plants face a mixed bag thanks to climate change

You may not have heard of them or given them much thought, but phytoplankton — the microscopic plants that grow throughout the world’s oceans — are the foundation of oceanic food webs. Although tiny, they…

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