Articles sur Science communication

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The Conversation publishes analysis and stories written by academics with a current university affiliation. from www.shutterstock.com

Who writes science and technology stories? More men than women

If you already write for The Conversation, thank you! But less than 30% of story pitches to our Science and Technology section come from women.
‘Clotted’ by Eli Moore reveals microscopic details of red blood cells in a clot, and was the winning entry in the 2018 UniSA Images of Research competition. UniSA

Seven beautiful images that share new stories of science

Images taken out of a research context and shared with the public offer a way to connect scientists with the broader world – and vice versa. These photos are stunning examples.
Vaccinations have saved countless lives and untold suffering, even though many adults still believe vaccines are bad for their children. Africa Studios/Shutterstock.com

Why vaccine opponents think they know more than medical experts

Vaccines have long been considered safe, but many people still believe they are not. A new study shows that people who think they know more than medical experts are more likely to believe that vaccine are not safe.
The colour of gold nanoparticles in suspension varies according to the size of the nanoparticles. Valeg96

Why nanotechnology is more than just a buzzword

Nanotechnology brings together multiple science disciplines to create devices that mimic the refinements of nature. It’s difficult – and exhilarating.
Could seeing things in black-and-white terms influence people’s views on scientific questions? Lightspring/Shutterstock.com

The thinking error at the root of science denial

Why do some people reject scientifically accepted ideas? A psychotherapist points to black-and-white thinking as part of the explanation.
One of the authors speaking at the 2017 March for Science. Emily Darling

Stand up for science: More researchers now see engagement as a crucial part of their job

Four scientists talk through the ways they now build outreach into their work as a way to spread their research's impact – something that wasn't the norm for past generations of academics.

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