Artikel-artikel mengenai Nature

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A Tsaatan community in northern Mongolia, herding reindeer. (Shutterstock)

COP25 climate summit: Action must include divestment, decolonization and resistance

Who wins, who loses and whose natures are being talked about when nature-based solutions are proposed?
When land central to the identity of locals is reshaped, so is the political landscape. Nikita Sud

Humans shape nature – but nature shapes us too

Big development projects can mean the loss of a community's identity and connection to their past.
A koala mother and joey seeking refuge on a bulldozed log pile near Kin Kin in Queensland. Federal environment laws have failed to prevent widespread land clearing across Australia. WWF Australia

Our nature laws are being overhauled. Here are 7 things we must fix

Environment Minister Sussan Ley has announced a review of Australia's nature laws. The poor state of our biodiversity shows we must do a better job of protecting the places we love.
Visitors walk through Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama’s installation ‘Fireflies on the Water.’ maurizio mucciola/flickr

In dandelions and fireflies, artists try to make sense of climate change

Images of wildfires are powerful, but can make climate catastrophe seem like something spectacular and distant. So some artists are focusing on the plants and bugs in our immediate surroundings.
How many lakes are in Alaska? Thermokarst lakes on Alaska’s North Slope are self-similar and fractal. Painting by Cherissa Dukelow

Mathematics of scale: Big, small and everything in between

What do earthquakes, wealthy Italian families and your circulatory system have in common? Scientists use fractals, self-similarity and power laws to translate from local to global scales.
The math of raindrops. Stefan Holm/shutterstock.com

What happens when a raindrop hits a puddle?

Why does the impact of rain in a puddle look different from when it falls elsewhere, like in a lake or the ocean? A 'puddle equation' dives deep into the secret math of ripples.
Mountains keep growing and growing and growing for many millions of years until they are so heavy that they can no longer grow taller, only wider. Photo by Jeff Finley on Unsplash

Curious Kids: how do mountains form?

When I was little, geologists worked out Earth's surface was made of pieces, like a giant puzzle. Those pieces, called “tectonic plates”, move and bump into each other and mountains form.

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