Artikel-artikel mengenai Women's rights

Menampilkan 21 - 40 dari 109 artikel

U.S. Sen. Martha McSally, R-Ariz., spoke during a Senate hearing on March 6 about being sexually assaulted in the military. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Sen. Martha McSally, pioneering Air Force pilot, shows how stereotypes victimize sexual assault survivors again

Sen. Martha McSally has broken gender barriers right and left. Despite the power she amassed over a career of firsts, she felt 'powerless' when raped. She's not the only woman to feel that way.
Female members of Congress wore white in a nod to suffragists during the State of the Union. AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

How white became the color of suffrage

Being the media-savvy women that they were, suffragists realized they needed to come up with a meaningful, recognizable brand.
Women in Mexico City carry a banner reading “Legal and safe abortion across Mexico” during the commemoration of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women (November 25, 2018). Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP

Is the future of abortion online?

While the abortion debate continues worldwide, even in countries where it has long been legal, new drugs and telemedicine services could provide access to safe abortion beyond borders and laws.
The Hague Convention on child abduction was drafted to deal with fathers abducting their children across borders after losing custody, but it’s applied mainly to mothers fleeing domestic violence. from shutterstock.com

Fleeing family violence to another country and taking your child is not ‘abduction’, but that’s how the law sees it

Under international law, a mother escaping domestic violence with her children to another country is seen as an abductor. She is often ordered to return the child leading to catastrophic consequences.
For many Muslim women, a hijab is a way of expressing resistance. AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty

Why do Muslim women wear a hijab?

Hijab is not simply about religion – women wear it for a variety of reasons.
Women in totalitarian states are among those particularly at risk by government’s use of Big Data to spy on its citizens. Matthew Henry/Unsplash

How governments use Big Data to violate human rights

If left unchecked, invasions of privacy enabled by technology could put every human right at risk, and on a scale that would be truly terrifying.
In Myanmar, gender inequality is fed by a deeply held concept called ‘hpon,’ which considers men to be spiritually and morally better than women. Reuters/Staff

Myanmar debates women’s rights amid evidence of pervasive sexual and domestic violence

In Myanmar, spousal abuse is legal and stigma stop most women from reporting sexual violence. A bill championed by feminists but long stalled in Parliament may soon give women their basic rights.
In 2017, the reduction of gender pay gaps came to a halt at the global level. Prazis/Shutterstock

Can pay reporting help reduce the gender pay gap?

More and more countries are relying on the approach of transparency rather than regulation. Depending on local specificities, the results to date remain mixed.
In certain communities in Benin, Togo and Ghana, young virgin girls are sent to atone for their family’s wrongdoing. Linda De Volder/Flickr

Girls in West Africa offered into sexual slavery as ‘wives of gods’

Trokosi is an ancient practice in West Africa where virgin girls, some as young as six are sent as slaves to make amends for wrongs committed by their families.
Women hold signs as they take part in a demonstration against government plans to ban or limit the practice of abortion in Turkey on 22 June 2012, in Istanbul. Reuters

Debate: When abortion is ‘haram’, women find strategies to claim their rights

Abortion appears to be illegal and clandestine in large parts of the Muslim world. Yet, women continue to challenge the status quo and archaic laws through their daily practices and activism.
Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg paying a courtesy call on Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, D-N.Y., left, and Sen. Joseph Biden, D-Del., in June 1993, before her confirmation hearing for the Supreme Court. AP/Marcy Nighswander

Ruth Bader Ginsburg helped shape the modern era of women’s rights – before she went on the Supreme Court

Before she became a Supreme Court justice, Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s work as an attorney in the 1970s fundamentally changed the court’s approach to women's rights and how we think about women – and men.
A woman in Saudi Arabia drives to work for the first time in Riyadh. AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty

Saudi women can drive, but are their voices being heard?

Saudi Arabia has arrested a number of feminists, while bringing in reforms for women. An expert argues why this goes to show that the kingdom remains adamant on not opening space for more voices.

Kontributor teratas

Lebih banyak