Artikel-artikel mengenai World War I

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The 1919 Victory Parade passes down Whitehall, to mark the end of World War I. PA Archive/PA Images

Remembrance Day: the enduring nature of the first two-minute silence

The first two-minute silence in 1919 was designed as a moment that could unite people across many divides. It has become a collective means of commemoration for all manner of tragedies
Vice President Mike Pence joins military officers and a chaplain on Aug. 23, 2019 in a prayer for two Army men who died during operations in Afghanistan. AP Photo/Cliff Owen

How the US military has embraced growing religious diversity

When the US entered World War I in 1917, military chaplains catered to majority white and Christian soldiers. Today the armed forces recognize over 200 denominations and religious groups.
Memory can serve as a heavy reminder of the past. Indigenous people gather in Shubenacadie, N.S., in June 2008 to remember the residents of a former residential school and the abuses they suffered. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Mike Dembeck

The importance of personal memory on Remembrance Day

Memories can be powerful tools to address humanity’s most difficult political, sociological and environmental problems
A British Pattern 1907 bayonet with leather scabbard. Wikimedia Commons

Friday essay: a short, sharp history of the bayonet

There is no weapon more visceral than the bayonet. It encourages an intimate form of killing, and during WW1, Australia troops plunged, parried and stabbed with great vigour.
Flag of Kurdistan on military uniform. Bumble Dee/Shutterstock.com

Why there is no Kurdish nation

Despite many attempts, the Kurds have never won and kept their own nation -- though, after World War I, they came close.
Rupert O’Flynn with Rudolf Marcuse’s bronze bust of Douglas Grant, December 2016. Photograph courtesy Tom Murray.

How we tracked down the only known sculpture of a WWI Indigenous soldier

In 1918, in Wünsdorf prisoner-of-war camp, a German sculptor created a bust of Indigenous soldier Douglas Grant. For decades, the whereabouts of this nationally significant sculpture were unknown - until now.
Descendants of soldiers who fought in the Australian Light Horse Brigade took part in a reenactment to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the battle of Beersheba in Israel in October 2017. Dan Peled/AAP

Telling the forgotten stories of Indigenous servicemen in the first world war

In Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, Anzac stories are often coloured by racism and ongoing injustices that negate the myth of Anzac 'mateship'.
Graffiti probably Banksy, denouncing the conditions in which prisoners have been detained in Guantanamo. Photo Eadmundo

The lesson of ‘The White Ribbon’ for today: How tolerant societies can drift into hatred

Michael Haneke's allegorical 2009 film showed how a peaceful society can be shattered within a single generation. It's a lesson for us now in a world drifting toward populism and violence.
A photograph of Ellen N. La Motte soon after completing ‘The Backwash of War’ in 1916. Courtesy of the National Archives, College Park, Maryland

Did a censored female writer inspire Hemingway’s famous style?

Ellen N. La Motte's 'The Backwash of War' was praised for its clear-eyed portrayal of war, but was swiftly banned. Yet the similarities between her spare prose and Hemingway's are unmistakable.

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