Dalhousie University

Founded in 1818, Dalhousie University is Atlantic Canada’s leading research-intensive university, driving the region’s intellectual, social and economic development.

Dalhousie is a truly national and international university, with more than half of our nearly 19,000 students coming from outside of Nova Scotia. Our 6,000 faculty and staff foster a diverse, purpose-driven community, one that spans 13 faculties and conducts over $135 million in research each year.

With 80 per cent of Nova Scotia’s publicly funded research, and as one of Canada’s leading universities for industry collaboration, we’re helping generate the talent, discoveries and innovations that will shape Atlantic Canada’s future.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 22 articles

Over 90 per cent of food and beverage product ads viewed by children and youth online are for unhealthy food products. (Shutterstock)

This is why child obesity rates have soared

New data on soaring child obesity should not come as a surprise. The food industry spends billions marketing unhealthy foods in a global society where over-eating is seen as a character flaw.
A worker handles meat at the Doly-Com abattoir in Romania in 2013 when Europe was facing a scandal over incorrectly declared horsemeat. The problem of food fraud and its health and economic implications affect a broad range of foods around the world, but technology could soon end the problem. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

How technology will help fight food fraud

Food fraud is a common problem that technologies such as blockchain and DNA fingerprinting can help to solve.
Climate change could severely impact the world’s coffee-producing nations and turn a cup of decent java into a luxury in the years to come. (Shutterstock)

How the coffee industry is about to get roasted by climate change

By 2100, more than 50 per cent of the land now used to grow coffee will no longer be arable. Climate change is changing the game to such an extent that Canada could one day become a coffee producer.
Finance Minister Bill Morneau is not the first Canadian politician to hold the job who’s been confronted with outrage over tax reform proposals. But it’s time to listen to people who get riled up about tax increases. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

Why we should listen to people angry about their taxes

Outrage over tax reform is nothing new. But if we can't be calm about tax, we can at least learn from the stories spoken in anger.
Scientists are using a powerful gene editing technique to understand how human embryos develop. shutterstock

Genome editing of human embryos broadens ethics discussions

A new gene editing experiment explores human development. With this comes new ethical questions: How do scientists acquire embryos and how are their projects approved?
Egg donors, sperm donors and surrogates are critical participants and patients in the use of reproductive technologies - so why are their rights and heath repeatedly overlooked? (Shutterstock)

Egg donors and surrogates need high-quality care

Health Canada is drafting important regulations for assisted reproductive technologies. Initial documents treat egg donors and surrogates as little more than spare parts and walking wombs.
Dairy cows at a family farm in Chilliwack, B.C. Sylvain Charlebois, a noted academic on food policy issues, says the federal government’s proposed tax reforms will hurt family farms. CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Down on the farm: tax reforms will hurt family businesses

Family farms, restaurants, other food businesses and the rural economy will suffer under federal tax proposals for small businesses,
Canada is one of very few industrialized countries not to have a national school food program. (Shutterstock)

Why your kids need a national school food program

As Canadian kids head back to school this week, many will be hungry. Lacking fruits, vegetables and other nutritious foods, they will suffer mood problems, disease and low academic performance.
A man shops for avocados at a Whole Foods Market in New York on Aug. 28. The splashy price cuts Amazon made as the new owner of Whole Foods has attracted some curious customers. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

Amazon’s appetite for disruption

Amazon has pledged to continue slashing prices at Whole Foods now that it's acquired the organic food mecca. Will that mean more affordable organic food for more people -- delivered overnight?
New research suggests that members of ethnic minorities like advertising that features ethnic minorities – but only their own. (Shutterstock)

Do minorities prefer ads with white people?

Visible minority consumers prefer advertising that features white models to advertising that feature models from other ethnic minority groups. Why?
Attempts to restructure our “obesogenic” food environment for health are often criticized - as restricting personal choice and freedom. (Shutterstock)

Is the food industry conspiring to make you fat?

Bombarded with unhealthy offerings by the food industry, we blame and shame ourselves for gaining weight. But is it really our fault, or are we being "entrapped?"
The Canadian lobster industry is now valued at over $1 billion, double what it was in 2010. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

Canadian lobster in the pink thanks to European trade deal

Lobster used to be a poor man's meal. Now it's the darling of foodies, and Canada's lobster producers are poised to cash in on sales to the European Union thanks to CETA.
Controversial gene editing should not proceed without citizen input and societal consensus. (Shutterstock)

Human genome editing: We should all have a say

A team in the U.S. is said to have safely and effectively altered human embryos. The news is a reminder that citizens must be consulted on developments potentially affecting the future of the species.
People gather in Montreal to demand a $15 minimum hourly wage in Quebec and across Canada. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes)

Minimum wage hike ignores impact of Artificial Intelligence

The minimum wage is rising in many parts of Canada, but it masks the impact of seismic changes to the agriculture, food and retail industries brought about by new technologies.
Researchers in Maine pose with terns after measuring, weighing and banding the birds. But what if they weren’t scientists? Amanda Boyd, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service/Flickr

Even scientists take selfies with wild animals. Here’s why they shouldn’t.

Why do so many people take safety risks or abuse wild animals for the sake of a photo with them? In one researcher's view, scientists may encourage this trend by sharing their own wildlife selfies.

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