The Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity

The Doherty Institute is a world-class institute combining research, teaching, public health and reference laboratory services, diagnostic services and clinical care into infectious diseases and immunity. The establishment of the Doherty Institute represents a radical change in the capacity of Australia and the world to detect, investigate and respond to existing, emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases and agents, with a major focus on diseases that pose serious public and global health threats such as influenza, tuberculosis, HIV, viral hepatitis and drug resistant bacteria. The Doherty’s activities are multi-disciplinary and cross-sectoral, placing great emphasis on translational research and improving clinical outcomes. Teams of interdisciplinary scientists, clinicians and epidemiologists collaborate on a wide spectrum of activities - from basic immunology and discovery research, to the development of new vaccines and new preventative and treatment methods, to surveillance and investigation of disease outbreaks.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 31 articles

Around 5% of adults and 90% of babies who contract hepatitis B go on to have life-long infection that can only be managed with regular medication. Ronald Rampsch/Shutterstock

We have a vaccine for hepatitis B but here’s why we still need a cure

Babies in Australia have been vaccinated against hepatitis B since May 2000, but 240,000 Australians still live with the disease.
While hepatitis B can’t be cured in the same way hepatitis C can, effective treatment is available. From shutterstock.com

In contrast to Australia’s success with hepatitis C, our response to hepatitis B is lagging

Curing thousands of Australians with hepatitis C is one of the public health success stories of recent years. We can take lessons from this as we continue in the fight against hepatitis B.
First recognised ten years ago, Candida auris is a fungus within the genus Candida. From shutterstock.com

Explainer: what is Candida auris and who is at risk?

Candida auris is a fungus which breeds most commonly in health-care settings. It's cause for concern because it's hard to detect, and is resistant to many anti-fungal drugs.
Opportunities to help drive the energy transition are everywhere - even in Western Australia’s remote salt pans. Peter C. Doherty

We have so many ways to pursue a healthy climate – it’s insane to wait any longer

Nobel Prizewinning health researcher Peter Doherty reflects on the challenge of delivering a healthy climate for the world. From hydrogen power to wooden skyscrapers, the options are endless, but all require leadership.
Rita Levi-Montalcini celebrates her 100th birthday in 2009. Presidenza della Repubblica Italiana/Wikimedia Commons

Dismissed under Mussolini, later Nobel prize winner – the importance of scientist Rita Levi-Montalcini

Born in Italy in 1909, Levi-Montalcini avoided being transported to Auschwitz as a young woman and rose to prominence as a neurobiologist. She was a co-recipient of the 1986 Nobel Prize for Medicine.
Imported frozen pomegranate seeds have been linked to hepatitis A infections in NSW. from www.shutterstock.com

What is hepatitis A and how can you get it from eating frozen fruit?

Hepatitis A is a virus that infects the liver. Symptoms usually take 15-50 days to develop after initial infection and typically last for several weeks or sometimes longer.
Some patients may be prescribed antibiotics as preventatives, rather than to treat infections. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Drug resistance: how we keep track of whether antibiotics are being used responsibly

We know overuse and inappropriate use of antibiotics contribute to resistance, so it's important we develop strategies to improve practice.
Like so many Indigenous people in the NT, Dr G. Yunupingu had chronic hepatitis B since he was a child. DAN HIMBRECHTS/AAP

Dr G. Yunupingu’s legacy: it’s time to get rid of chronic hepatitis B in Indigenous Australia

Hepatitis B rates in Indigenous communities are ten times higher than the rest of Australia. Eliminating the infection from Indigenous Australia can make a significant contribution to closing the gap.
The most important blood borne viruses for human health are the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Why are only some viruses transmissible by blood and how are they actually spread?

Why is it only some viruses are transmissible by blood, and how does the virus actually move from person to person?
Medical workers move a woman, who is suspected of having Ebola, upon her arrival at Meioxeiro Hospital, in Vigo, northwestern Spain, 28 October 2015. SALVADOR SAS (EPA)/ AAP

Speaking with: Peter Doherty about infectious disease pandemics

Professor Peter Doherty on infectious disease pandemics. The Conversation, CC BY-ND47.6 MB (download)
William Isdale speaks with the University of Melbourne's Professor Peter Doherty about infectious disease pandemics.
March for Science events will be held across the world on April 22 2017. from www.shutterstock.com

Peter Doherty: why Australia needs to march for science

In its broadest sense, the March for Science aims to cause US legislators to reflect a little and understand what they risk if they choose to erode their global scientific leadership.
Recent improvements in medical management of HIV infection are not well understood in the legal sector. www.shutterstock.com

Australian law needs a refresher on the science of HIV transmission

HIV diagnosis is devastating for patients and their families. But the infection is no longer a death sentence, and should not be prosecuted as such say experts.
The thing all five viruses have in common is they can cause mild to very severe liver damage. wk1003mike/Shutterstock

Explainer: the A, B, C, D and E of hepatitis

Hepatitis A, B, C, D and E are very different viruses. Hepatitis A is genetically closer to the common cold than it is to hepatitis B. Hepatitis C is closer to the virus that causes dengue fever.
PrEP works by preventing susceptible cells becoming infected with HIV. Truvada blocks the HIV virus from making copies of itself. Marc Bruxelle/Shutterstock

Weekly Dose: Truvada, the drug that can prevent HIV infection

Efficacy is estimated to be as high as 99% in men who have sex with men who take Truvada daily.

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