University of Arkansas

Founded in 1871 as a land-grant college and state university, the University of Arkansas established its campus on a hilltop overlooking the Ozark Mountains. There were few facilities and little money that first academic year, but the eight students and three faculty members who gathered for classes in 1872 showed the same dedication to learning and commitment to excellence that has carried the University of Arkansas into the 21st century.

More than 140 years later, the university’s enrollment is more than 25,000 and its students represent all 50 states and 120 countries. The university is the state’s foremost partner and resource for education and economic development. It serves as the major provider of graduate-level instruction in Arkansas. And its public service activities reach every county in Arkansas, throughout the nation, and around the world.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 27 articles

El tren propuesto por el gobierno de Andrés Manuel López Obrador conectaría el sitio arqueológico de Chichen Itza con Cancún y otros resortes turísticos del Yucatan. REUTERS/Mauricio Marat/National Institute of Anthropology and History

México quiere construir un tren en el corazón de la región Maya, ¿debería de hacerlo?

El propuesto Tren Maya podría brindar beneficios sustanciales a México. Pero debe ser diseñado en una manera que respete la delicada ecología, historia indígena y tejido social del Yucatán.
College rankings often take student caliber into account, an analysis shows. vectorfusionart/Shutterstock.com

College rankings might as well be student rankings

College rankings are set up to make you believe one college is better than another. But a closer look reveals college rankings may be measuring something entirely different.
A proposed new train in Mexico would connect the archaeological site of Chichen Itza, on the Yucatan Peninsula, easier to reach from Cancun. REUTERS/Mauricio Marat/National Institute of Anthropology and History

Mexico wants to run a tourist train through its Mayan heartland — should it?

An ambitious new train would link resorts like Cancun to inland ancient ruins and colonial towns. That means laying rail across 932 miles of dense jungle, pristine beach and indigenous villages.
A delegate in traditional Uighur dress listens to a speaker during a meeting with delegates from China’s Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region in Beijing, AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein

The history of China’s Muslims and what’s behind their persecution

Muslims came to China in the 13th century and played an influential role. Tensions have escalated since 9/11, and the global community is largely silent.
Is there really a strong division between folks like Brexit leader Farage and global citizens Bill Gates and Canadian PM Justin Trudeau? REUTERS/Peter Nicholls, Geoff Robins

Rise in globalism doesn’t mean the end for nationalists

Data show that many people who consider themselves ‘global citizens’ also harbor strong national sentiments. The two aren’t mutually exclusive.
A brother and sister take shelter from aerial attacks in the rebel-held territory of the Nuba Mountains in South Kordofan. Reuters/Goran Tomasevic

Tragedy in the Nuba Mountains: hunger and starvation are constants

The world has turned its back on the Nuba people of Sudan. Despite the critical need for food, none of the organisations involved in helping people in dire need have attempted to deliver aid to them.
Massive bodies can send ripples through space time in the form of gravitational waves. NASA

Gravitational waves discovered: top scientists respond

The long awaited discovery of gravitational waves has sent ripples through the scientific world. Here top experts respond to the historic announcement.
Arrangement in Grey and Black No.1 (commonly known as Whistler’s Mother), by James McNeill Whistler (1871). Wikimedia Commons

The extraordinary life of Whistler’s mother

The famous portrait, usually resident in France, is on a rare tour in the US. From looking at it, one might assume its subject had a tranquil, even monotonous, life. But one would be wrong.
A child cries in a cave shelter in Tess village in the rebel-held territory of the Nuba Mountains in South Kordofan. Countless children have been killed by government forces. Goran Tomasevic/Reuters

The world’s unexplained silence over human tragedy in the Nuba Mountains of Sudan

Countless Nuba children have been killed by shrapnel, others from a loss of blood pouring from severed limbs. Others have stepped on landmines planted by Sudan's troops.

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