University of Pretoria

The University is a values-based, research-intensive university that equips its students to succeed in a rapidly changing world by providing students with inquiry-led training and learning opportunities. The University of Pretoria’s long-term Strategic Plan captures the essence of a shared vision, aiming to sustain UP’s quality and relevance as a university that is firmly rooted in Africa, and to harness its existing and future potential for diversity. UP strives to ensure that it is recognised in the global marketplace of knowledge production.

UP has nine faculties and a business school: - Economic and Management Sciences - Education - Engineering, Built Environment and Information Technology - Health Sciences - Humanities - Law - Natural and Agricultural Sciences - Theology - Veterinary Science (the only faculty of its kind in South Africa) - the Gordon Institute of Business Science (GIBS).

The University of Pretoria came into existence in 1908 as the Pretoria branch of the Transvaal University College. The College became a fully-fledged university in 1930 and the colloquial name Tuks, or Tukkies, was derived from the acronym TUC for Transvaal University College. UP’s current facilities portfolio consists of more than 790 buildings and structures spread over 33 sites located on six campuses that cover 1100 hectares of land. In the 106 years of its existence the University has produced more than 230 000 alumni. The University prides itself on producing well-rounded, creative graduates, responsible, productive citizens and future leaders. Great emphasis is placed on student life and support as well as the advancement of sport, art, culture and music.

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South African exports to the rest of the continent have more than doubled over the past 20 years. This has been driven by agricultural products, including maize. Shutterstock

Why Africa offers growing opportunities for agricultural products

The demand for agricultural products in Africa is expected to rise over the next 35 years due to factors such as population growth, urbanisation, economic growth and changing diets.
Nowcasting is a system using satellite images to obtain real-time information before bad weather arrives. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

How satellites are helping Africa improve weather forecasts

Being able to predict the weather can save lives. Using new technology forecasters are able to provide realtime warning of bad weather ahead.
Farm workers tend to a tobacco crop in Zimbabwe in 2014. The push to establish a business and human rights treaty is fraught with problems. Reuter/Philimon Bulawayo

Why we need to tread carefully in drawing up human rights rules for business

Traditionally human rights are viewed as being indivisible, interdependent and interrelated. The notion that a company may need to choose which human rights it will protect is antithetical.
A South African farmer from Piketberg 100km outside Cape Town inspects the dry soil in his field of sewn wheat. It is cheaper to import the crop than to grow it commercially. Epa/Nic Bothma

South Africa’s struggling agricultural sector: what went wrong 20 years ago

South Africa's agricultural industry has struggled over the past 20 years due to the country's rush to liberalise the sector while other countries continued to support their farmers.
The Square Kilometre Array project has already resulted in the upgrading of South Africa’s expertise in big data processing, high-speed internet and engineering. Reuters/Mike Hutchings

When and how spending on science can lead to big social returns

The difficulty for South Africa's minister of science and technology – and for economic policy within all African countries – is the question of how to raise levels of innovation.
South Africa, which has a shortage of energy, has three options for greater energy efficiency. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

How South Africa can transition to a less energy-intensive economy

Shifting South Africa's economy from energy intensive sectors to those with lower energy consumption will take more time, and even more funding. But the impact will be more permanent and sustainable.
Leaders from the Group of Seven (G7) industrial nations in the Bavarian Alps for a summit in June. Time is ripe for a courageous shift in global leadership. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

Forget the G7, the world needs a new alliance to lead it in the 21st century

The world needs an alliance of leading well-being economies, a WE7, to lead it in the 21st century. It would be the first step towards a global network committed to a sustainable future for the planet.
Anti-virus software can keep cyber-criminals at bay. shutterstock

Seven easy steps to keep viruses from your devices

Throwing a safety net over one's computer, mobile handset or tablet is a necessity because of the threat of viruses and infections through removable devices.
There are lessons to be learnt about the ICC from the Kellogg-Briand Pact, signed in 1928. It failed to prevent the outbreak of war but brought war criminals to justice later. Reuters

ICC: sad lesson of lofty ideals trumped by reality repeats itself

The ICC has not lived up to its noble intentions of making the world more just. Its failure echoes that of the 1928 Kellogg-Briand Pact, which set out to banish wars and to settle disputes peacefully.
A concerted drive to develop the technology sector has transformed Mauritius into a cyber island. Shutterstock

Better connectivity has economic spinoffs for Africa

Increased internet connectivity can spur economic growth throughout Africa. But the continent has a long way to go before it can reap any broadband dividend.

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