University of Pretoria

The University is a values-based, research-intensive university that equips its students to succeed in a rapidly changing world by providing students with inquiry-led training and learning opportunities. The University of Pretoria’s long-term Strategic Plan captures the essence of a shared vision, aiming to sustain UP’s quality and relevance as a university that is firmly rooted in Africa, and to harness its existing and future potential for diversity. UP strives to ensure that it is recognised in the global marketplace of knowledge production.

UP has nine faculties and a business school: - Economic and Management Sciences - Education - Engineering, Built Environment and Information Technology - Health Sciences - Humanities - Law - Natural and Agricultural Sciences - Theology - Veterinary Science (the only faculty of its kind in South Africa) - the Gordon Institute of Business Science (GIBS).

The University of Pretoria came into existence in 1908 as the Pretoria branch of the Transvaal University College. The College became a fully-fledged university in 1930 and the colloquial name Tuks, or Tukkies, was derived from the acronym TUC for Transvaal University College. UP’s current facilities portfolio consists of more than 790 buildings and structures spread over 33 sites located on six campuses that cover 1100 hectares of land. In the 106 years of its existence the University has produced more than 230 000 alumni. The University prides itself on producing well-rounded, creative graduates, responsible, productive citizens and future leaders. Great emphasis is placed on student life and support as well as the advancement of sport, art, culture and music.

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Post-election violence in Kenya in January 2008. The country was forewarned in its peer review report that trouble was brewing, but took no action. EPA

Why Africa is losing out by letting the peer review process collapse

The African Peer Review Mechanism has made a difference since it was started in 2003. There are multiple examples of reforms that have been introduced as a result. All have gone unnoticed.
The question arises time and time again about why jazz festivals include other genres - and the answer is really simple. www.shutterstock.com

Why debates about jazz festivals should be about more than genre purism

Jazz represents a minority audience in an already relatively small music market and to cover costs, the aggregation of fans must be across genres to maximise numbers.
Food insecurity is not only a matter of hunger but may have multiple manifestations. Reuters/Emma Farge

Food insecurity is more than just severe hunger

Food insecurity is a problem that doesn't only stem from hunger. It is also a result of eating food that is not nutritious.
Jacob Zuma speaking at the Union Buildings in Pretoria. Adversarial policymaking is taking root in South Africa, where new proposals are increasingly being fought in the media and the courts. Reuters/Skyler Reid

Why policymaking in South Africa has become more adversarial

Too many new laws in South Africa are poorly thought through at the policy formulation stage. The new Socio-economic Impact Assessment will need rigorously support throughout government to succeed.
For many children who are victims of crime, their remains are only discovered some time later as a result of perpetrators concealing the crime. shutterstock

Giving faces to South Africa’s missing children

New data which details how South African children age and their faces grow will prove invaluable in finding missing children.
Demonstrators dressed as embryos gather outside the French parliament to protest laws authorising research on embryonic stem cells. Across the world, countries are implementing additional laws to use treatments that are still in trial phases. Reuters/Benoit Tessier

Why the world needs to keep pace with breakthroughs in stem cell research

Many countries are introducing legislation and allowing practitioners to use medication still undergoing trials but that show preliminary signs of being safe, including some stem cell treatments.
Legislation in South Africa needs to be updated to accommodate the development in stem cell research and therapies. Reuters

Why South Africa needs better laws for stem cell research and therapy

South Africa may have legislation broadly guiding stem cell research and treatment, but these laws must be updated and clarified for it to be effective.
South African exports to the rest of the continent have more than doubled over the past 20 years. This has been driven by agricultural products, including maize. Shutterstock

Why Africa offers growing opportunities for agricultural products

The demand for agricultural products in Africa is expected to rise over the next 35 years due to factors such as population growth, urbanisation, economic growth and changing diets.

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