University of Pretoria

The University is a values-based, research-intensive university that equips its students to succeed in a rapidly changing world by providing students with inquiry-led training and learning opportunities. The University of Pretoria’s long-term Strategic Plan captures the essence of a shared vision, aiming to sustain UP’s quality and relevance as a university that is firmly rooted in Africa, and to harness its existing and future potential for diversity. UP strives to ensure that it is recognised in the global marketplace of knowledge production.

UP has nine faculties and a business school: - Economic and Management Sciences - Education - Engineering, Built Environment and Information Technology - Health Sciences - Humanities - Law - Natural and Agricultural Sciences - Theology - Veterinary Science (the only faculty of its kind in South Africa) - the Gordon Institute of Business Science (GIBS).

The University of Pretoria came into existence in 1908 as the Pretoria branch of the Transvaal University College. The College became a fully-fledged university in 1930 and the colloquial name Tuks, or Tukkies, was derived from the acronym TUC for Transvaal University College. UP’s current facilities portfolio consists of more than 790 buildings and structures spread over 33 sites located on six campuses that cover 1100 hectares of land. In the 106 years of its existence the University has produced more than 230 000 alumni. The University prides itself on producing well-rounded, creative graduates, responsible, productive citizens and future leaders. Great emphasis is placed on student life and support as well as the advancement of sport, art, culture and music.

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To understand inequality in countries like South Africa, it is important to have a good grasp of factors influencing the allocation of skills and knowledge. Shutterstock

How unequal access to knowledge is affecting South African society

In a country as unequal as South Africa, the people who have access to higher education have the power to shape the society, including its elites and middle class.
Anopheles Gambiae, one of three mosquitoes found in Africa that transmit malaria. shutterstock

Seven things worth knowing about mosquitoes

The irritating buzz that rings in your ear in the dead of the night comes from an insect barely traceable with your naked eye. Here are a few facts worth knowing about the mosquito.
A report released by the World Health Organisation has ranked red meat as probably carcinogenic to humans, possibly causing bowel cancer. Supplied

Cancer and meat – too much hype?

The World Health Organisation's report on the increased cancer risk with eating processed and red meat has been met with mixed reactions.
There is amazing research and knowledge coming out of Africa – you just need to know where to look. Shutterstock

Here’s one way to recover and protect Africa’s ‘lost science’

African research is largely invisible, kept in the shadows by publishing barriers and structural obstacles. A platform built in Brazil and rolled out across the developing world could be the solution.
It’s one thing for a country’s academics to produce great research – but what’s the point if ordinary citizens can’t access it? Shutterstock

Why it’s getting harder to access free, quality academic research

South Africans' access to important knowledge and research is incredibly limited. In this time of Open Access, why is this the case – and will it ever change?
South Africa is far from being the non-racial, classless society envisaged by 1970s activists. Reuters/Alessandro Bianchi

How the failed ideals of 1970s activists haunt post-apartheid South Africa

The egalitarian society envisioned by political activists and thinkers Rick Turner and Steve Biko has not been realised. But, they continue to inspire critiques of post-apartheid South Africa.
Post-election violence in Kenya in January 2008. The country was forewarned in its peer review report that trouble was brewing, but took no action. EPA

Why Africa is losing out by letting the peer review process collapse

The African Peer Review Mechanism has made a difference since it was started in 2003. There are multiple examples of reforms that have been introduced as a result. All have gone unnoticed.
The question arises time and time again about why jazz festivals include other genres - and the answer is really simple. www.shutterstock.com

Why debates about jazz festivals should be about more than genre purism

Jazz represents a minority audience in an already relatively small music market and to cover costs, the aggregation of fans must be across genres to maximise numbers.

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