Articles on Bacteria

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Though commonly associated with food poisoning, the strain of salmonella used is a benign variety. Shutterstock/Tatiana Shepeleva

Could friendly bacteria be used to treat cancer?

What started with a study of diseases transmitted by mosquitos, could end with a new way of treating cancer.
Illustration of pressure sensing bacteria in soils from the ‘Computational Colloids Project’. Carolina Ramirez-Figuroa, Luis Hernan and Martyn Dade-Robertson

The cities of the future could be built by microbes

Bacteria can produce their own 'buildings' so scientists are genetically engineering them to build ours.
Surface oil slick from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Andreas Teske, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill.

Can we harness bacteria to help clean up future oil spills?

Genetic analysis shows that marine bacteria broke down much of the oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill. These findings could lead to more effective cleanups after future spills.
It’s bacterial biofilms that give the Grand Prismatic Spring its colorful hues. Karin Sauer

Unlocking the secrets of bacterial biofilms – to use against them

The vast majority of the bacteria that surround us are not free-floating but prefer to band together in cooperative communities called biofilms. How do biofilms form and cooperate?
A virus is essentially an information system (encoded in DNA or RNA) surrounded by a protective coat. Tom Thai/Flickr

Disease evolution: our long history of fighting viruses

Humans have a deep history of viral infections, the evidence for which dates back to ancient DNA from Egyptian mummies.
No, not that kind of lime: the disease is named after a town in the US where the disease was first recognised.

Explainer: what is Lyme disease and does it exist in Australia?

The debate about Lyme disease and its presence in Australia has occupied media headlines and the minds of scientists and health professionals for over three decades.

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