Curriculum

articles 1 to 20 of 45

Taking the curriculum “back to basics” will disadvantage kids who perhaps don’t have access to cultural and other knowledge at home. AAP/Tim Dornin

We lose more than we gain by paring back the curriculum

We run a significant risk that the divide between the haves and have-nots will widen even further through the "back to basics" curriculum approach advocated by Education Minister Pyne.
For every student who knowingly steals other people’s words and ideas, there are 10 who are not trying to be dishonest. From www.shutterstock.com

Policing plagiarism could make universities miss the real problems

For every student who intentionally steals others' work and passes it off as her own, there are ten who don't yet know how to build academic knowledge. They need our help, not condemnation.
Rather than rejecting all indigenous knowledge as witchcraft or as somehow inferior, we should explore the value in different knowledge systems. Goran Tomasevic/Reuters

Why indigenous knowledge has a place in the school science curriculum

There are valuable and authentic wisdom traditions in all cultures. How can indigenous knowledge be woven into the existing science curriculum?
A student protests against colonial-era statues at the University of Cape Town. Changing the curriculum structure is another way to decolonise South Africa’s universities. Mike Hutchings/Reuters

Decolonise more than just curriculum content – change the structure, too

It's not just the content of South Africa's university curricula that needs to be re-examined. The country's degree structure should be reconsidered, too.
If you think about it, producing graduates who can think critically is good for any society. From www.shutterstock.com

Working together for critical thinking in schools

The ability to think critically benefits individuals and societies. Why, then, is it so rare for critical thinking to be taught in schools?
History is not just a few facts to be memorized. Greg Wass/Flickr

History is a process, not a pile of flash card facts

History is not a 'thing' to be memorized, as some in the Oklahoma legislature might believe, but a living process, to be understood in all its complexity.
Pyne will ask the states to implement various aspects of the Curriculum Review, probably including the narrowing of content. This is easier said than done. AAP

Paring back the curriculum would be a difficult and unnecessary task

This week the ministers of education for the states and territories will consider recommendations from federal Education Minister Christopher Pyne to revise the Australian curriculum. These recommendations…
Testing times for future students. Ben Birchall/PA Wire

Students deserve better than this shambolic A Level reform

The teachers of tomorrow should be eager to prepare for “your future, their future”, according to the National College for Teaching and Leadership’s new teacher-training recruitment campaign. Sadly they…
Prepare children to think. mezzoblue

Why there should be a philosophy GCSE

Our world is built on ideas. We have ideas about how science should be conducted, how a liberal society should defend itself, how discussion is better than conflict, how far toleration should be extended…
Common goals can become a common problem. Shutterstock classroom

Explainer: why are schools adopting the Common Core?

The Common Core State Standards Initiative (or Common Core) is a quintessentially American approach to addressing the relatively modest academic performance of many students. The Common Core seeks to raise…
The best of our society’s thoughts and ideas should be compulsory learning for all students. AAP

A common curriculum means all students share common values

Should all schools, whether government, Catholic or independent, be forced to follow a centrally designed and monitored curriculum? And should this central curriculum be imposed upon schools regardless…
What if want a chance to get an A*? David Davies/PA Archive

Tiered GCSE papers that cap ambition should be abolished

Children’s access to high grades at GCSE is determined by our examination system, which assigns grade limits in some subjects. Known as tiering, this means that some 16-year-olds sit a foundation GCSE…
What did you get? Niall Carson/PA Wire

Permanent revolution of A Level exams helps nobody

A Level results are in and as teenagers pore over their grades, a record number will be able to take up places at university. The results – which show a small decline in the overall pass rate for the first…

Top contributors

More