Articles on Emoji

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What can researchers learn from how people use emoji during tragedies? The Conversation

Understanding the emoji of solidarity

New research discovered how people use emoji to express their concern and support during tragedies and disasters.
In Chinese, the phrase “rice bunny” is pronounced as “mi tu” and has become a nickname for the #MeToo campaign. Marcella Cheng/The Conversation NY-BD-CC

From #MeToo to #RiceBunny: how social media users are campaigning in China

After the hashtag #MeTooInChina was blocked by Chinese authorities in mid-January, social media users made creative use of nicknames and emojis to evade censorship and highlight harassment.
Scholars have ideas about how to help solve our password problems. vladwei/Shutterstock.com

Using truly secure passwords: 6 essential reads

A roundup of research into what makes passwords secure, and options for new standards of login authentication.
Which emoji captures how you’re feeling today? from www.shutterstock.com

Why I use emoji in research and teaching

Emoji provide a living language that is representative and inclusive in ways that words can't always be. Just be careful if you use the eggplant or peach emoji.

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