Articles on Reconciliation

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Concrete action steps are needed to help reconciliation, says a research team that offers 12 actionable ideas. Here Ben Paul, of the Musqueam First Nation, sings and plays a drum during the Walk for Reconciliation in Vancouver, B.C., on Sept. 24, 2017, held to promote positive relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

New guide kick-starts reconciliation in the justice system

It's been three years since the TRC released its report on the lasting impact of residential schools in Canada but responses to the 94 Calls to Action have been slow. A new framework hopes to change that.
The Fort Hood military base in Killeen, Texas. AP Photo/ Tamir Kalifa

10 US military bases are named after Confederate generals

In scrutinizing statues honoring Confederate figures, journalists have overlooked military bases named after generals who fought to defend the slavery of black people.
Plays like ‘Where the Blood Mixes’ (with actors Kim Harvey and Billy Merasty) help shed light on Indigenous stories, helping to educate Canadian audiences. David Cooper

Indigenous theatre would thrive with funds from the Canadian government

Indigenous theatre and storytelling provides an opportunity for all Canadians to honour the directives of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. The Canadian government should support this mission.
A statue of John A. Macdonald in Montreal has been repeatedly vandalized with red paint to symbolize blood. As the debate continues about removing statues, what specific actions are needed to promote reconciliation? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Reconciliation requires more than symbolic gestures

Removing statues of historical figures may be important symbolic statements when it comes to reconciliation, but action on important Indigenous issues like land claims and education are needed more.
Four hikers walk west, from the village of Val Marie in southern Saskatchewan, along a historical trail once used by Indigenous tribes and settlers. Giving Canadians the ‘right to roam’ might be a small step toward answering the calls of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. James R. Page

Why Canadians need ‘the right to roam’

A right-to-roam movement has never developed in Canada the way it has in the U.K. Here's how it could benefit Canadian society as a whole, including reconciliation efforts with the Indigenous.
Names of lynching victims at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Ala. AP/Brynn Anderson

How to heal African-Americans’ traumatic history

The National Memorial for Peace and Justice helps demonstrate that the lynching of black people was not the fault of victims. But telling this history risks re-traumatizing the black community.
A Simon Fraser University student wears a First Nations Coast Salish woven cedar hat as she and other students wait to receive their degrees during the fall convocation ceremony at the university in Burnaby, B.C., on October 11, 2013. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Why there are so few Indigenous graduates at convocation

Wilful under-funding of Indigenous education is producing an Indigenous underclass.
Cambodian villagers walk to a courtroom before appeal hearings for two Khmer Rouge senior leaders facing charges of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. AP Photo/Heng Sinith

A scholar’s journey to understand the needs of Pol Pot’s survivors

Research on profound human suffering requires more than intellectual understanding of legal and political mechanics. It requires a human journey that goes deeply into victims' experiences and needs.
Barney Williams Jr., a residential school survivor, hugs Santa Ono, president of the University of British Columbia, during the opening of the Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre at Vancouver, on April 9. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ben Nelms

A university president apologizes for academia’s role in residential schools

The role of universities in the shameful Indian residential school system needs to be addressed. The president of one of Canada's leading universities explains why it's time to apologize.
Many homes in remote Indigenous communities rely on wood or diesel for heating. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Clean energy can advance Indigenous reconciliation

More than 200 remote communities in Canada rely on diesel fuel for energy. Cleaner options could fuel a better quality of life.
If the government expanded the new $73 million Student Work-Integrated Learning program to all students it could help tackle Canada’s most intractable social problems — such as homelessness, reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, affordable housing, social cohesion and intercultural understanding.

Government should expand student placements into social sector

A new government program will create 10,000 work placements for undergraduates in only business and STEM subjects. Why not fund students to innovate in the social sector too?

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