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Articles on Palliative care

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Several factors ranging from personal spiritual beliefs to patient relationships to medical legal issues can influence whether a health-care practitioner participates in providing medical assistance in dying (MAID). (Shutterstock)

Health-care providers and MAID: The reasons why some don’t offer medically assisted death

For people to access medical assistance in dying (MAID) requires health-care professionals willing to provide the service. The reasons health-care providers choose not to participate are important.
You can start these conversations simply, like saying, “I need to think about the future. Can you help me?” Richard Ross/The Image Bank via Getty Images

End-of-life conversations can be hard, but your loved ones will thank you

When you prepare to talk about end-of-life decisions and the legacy you want to leave behind, try thinking about them as gifts you bestow to family and friends.
Improving death-friendliness offers further opportunity to improve social inclusion. A death-friendly approach could lay the groundwork for people to stop fearing getting old or alienating those who have. (Shutterstock)

Death-friendly communities ease fear of aging and dying

Death-friendly communities that welcome mortality might help us live better lives and provide better care for people at the end of their lives.
Minister of Justice David Lametti gives a thumbs up as he rises to vote in favour of a motion on Bill C-7, medical assistance in dying, in the House of Commons on Dec. 10, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

A dangerous path: Why expanding access to medical assistance in dying keeps us up at night

Expanding access to medical assistance in dying (MAID) to those not terminally ill puts vulnerable people at risk of feeling pressured into MAID, and doctors at risk of being forced to facilitate it.
The Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association is calling on health authorities to “implement a more compassionate approach to end-of-life visitations … during the COVID-19 pandemic.” (Shutterstock)

Coronavirus public health restrictions shouldn’t mean dying alone

Preventing people from dying alone in a pandemic takes ingenuity and money, but it’s the right thing to do.
In a research study, 84 per cent of residents and families who received a pamphlet about end-of-life choices felt encouraged to think about their future care. (Shutterstock)

To die well, we must talk about death before the end of life

The seriously ill and their families often want to protect each other from thoughts of death. Conversation about end-of-life choices are, however, essential to a good death.
Without an understanding of the complexities of medically assisted dying, it’s difficult for patients and families to make good decisions. (Shutterstock)

Why people choose medically assisted death revealed through conversations with nurses

Nurses who surround the process of medically assisted dying are an important source of insight into the real conversations our society needs to have about what it’s really like.
A person wanting to access voluntary assisted dying must meet strict criteria, including having a medical condition that is considered to be advanced and progressive. From shutterstock.com

WA’s take on assisted dying has many similarities with the Victorian law – and some important differences

Western Australia might soon become the second state in Australia to legalise voluntary assisted dying. Its proposed law draws on the Victorian model, but has some important differences, too.
On June 19, Victoria will become the first state in Australia to legalise voluntary assisted dying. From shutterstock.com

We don’t know all the details of how voluntary assisted dying will work yet – but the system is ready

As we sit on the cusp of voluntary assisted dying becoming legal in Victoria, we expect it won’t always be simple for people who want it to access it – at least in the legislation’s early days.

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