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Articles on Privacy

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In many cases, getting on a plane, attending a show or going to a store requires an app that proves you’ve been vaccinated. AP Photo/Amr Nabil

Vaccination passport apps could help society reopen – first they have to be secure, private and trusted

How do you prove that people have been vaccinated without putting their privacy at risk? The technology and best practices to make it happen exist. It's far from clear, however, if they're being used.
Google’s new advertising claims to preserve user privacy, but it still gathers and processes the details of our online activities. (Shutterstock)

Google’s AI advertising revolution: More privacy, but problems remain

Google is using artificial intelligence to collect and process user data in a way that produces more nuanced and detailed information about our activities but addresses privacy concerns.
Exposure notification systems alert people when they’ve been exposed to the coronavirus but don’t record the information. AleksandarGeorgiev/E+ via Getty Images

How Apple and Google let your phone warn you if you’ve been exposed to the coronavirus while protecting your privacy

Bluetooth wireless communication makes it possible to track when people have been exposed to people infected with the coronavirus. The right cryptography scheme keeps alerts about exposures private.
The growing use of artificial intelligence in health care should be driven by careful consideration of what is important to members of the public. (Shutterstock)

What the public hopes and fears about the use of AI in health care

The use of artificial intelligence in health care is on the rise, and the concerns of the public need to be considered in developing policy that regulates its application.
New DNA analysis revealed that Calvin Hoover killed Christine Jessop in 1984. Toronto Police Chief James Ramer sits next to a screen displaying photos of Calvin Hoover during a news conference on Oct. 15, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Christine Jessop’s killer identified: Solved cold case raises questions about genetic privacy

Christine Jessop was murdered in 1984 and, 36 years later, DNA evidence finally identified her killer. But the police investigation's use of genetic genealogical databases raised questions about privacy.
Differential privacy lets organizations collect people’s data while protecting their privacy, but it’s not foolproof. imaginima/E+ via Getty Images

People want data privacy but don’t always know what they’re getting

Differential privacy lets people to share data anonymously, but people need to know more about it to make informed decisions.

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