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Articles sur Menopause

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Progesterone doesn’t seem to cause the blood clots, heart diseases and breast cancer associated with estrogen-dominant menopausal hormone therapy. (Shutterstock)

Hot flashes? Night sweats? Progesterone can help reduce symptoms of menopause

Science shows that many perimenopausal miseries — such as hot flashes, night sweats and trouble sleeping — are caused by excess or variable estrogen, not by "estrogen deficiency."
Shutterstock

Childhood, adolescence, pregnancy, menopause, 75+: how your diet should change with each stage of life

Childhood, adolescence, pregnancy, menopause, 75+: how your diet should change with each stage of life. The Conversation, CC BY56,6 Mo (download)
Once you get older, the focus moves to trying not to lose your muscle tissue. So as you age, your protein requirements actually start to go up.
This isn’t the first time scientific research has found a link between menopausal hormone therapy and breast cancer. From shutterstock.com

We don’t know menopausal hormone therapy causes breast cancer, but the evidence continues to suggest a link

A study published recently in The Lancet indicated menopausal hormone therapy is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. How can we interpret the results?
Osteoporosis affects one in three women, but men are also concerned. Shutterstock

Could the solution to osteoporosis be in the bile?

There is no treatment for osteoporosis, which affects millions of people and costs billions of euros every year. What if the solution was in the bile? Explanations.
Canada has done a remarkable job of reducing lead in people’s bodies. But the experience of Flint, Mich. – where children were exposed to toxic levels of lead – teaches us to remain cautious. Here, Flint citizens watch testimonies before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, in Washington during 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

From IQ to blood pressure, we should not be complacent about lead

Reduced lead exposure has made us smarter and healthier. Could changes in regulatory agencies across North America endanger this?

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