Menu Fermer

Articles sur US energy policy

Affichage de 1 à 20 de 96 articles

Aerial view of the 6-megawatt Stanton Solar Farm near Orlando, Fla. Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Who pays and who benefits from a massive expansion of solar power?

President Biden’s proposed solar power expansion would cost $350 billion in federal support over the coming decade. An energy expert explains where that money would come from and who it would help.
Energy storage can make facilities like this solar farm in Oxford, Maine, more profitable by letting them store power for cloudy days. AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty

These 3 energy storage technologies can help solve the challenge of moving to 100% renewable electricity

The US is generating more electricity than ever from wind and solar power – but often it’s not needed at the time it’s produced. Advanced energy storage technologies make that power available 24/7.
Wind turbines near Glenrock, Wyo. AP Photo/Matt Young

The US electric power sector is halfway to zero carbon emissions

Fifteen years ago electric power generation was the largest source of US greenhouse gas emissions. Now the power sector is leading the shift to a clean energy economy.
Solar power is becoming more common for households at all income levels. These homes in Richmond, California, went solar with the help of GRID Alternatives. GRID Alternatives

Cheaper solar power means low-income families can also benefit – with the right kind of help

Solar power doesn’t have to be just for the wealthy anymore. With the right kind of financial incentives, households at all income levels can benefit from affordable clean energy.
A pump jack in the town of Signal Hill, California, which sits within the Long Beach Oil Field near the Port of Long Beach. Frederick J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Living near active oil and gas wells in California tied to low birth weight and smaller babies

A new study finds an association between living near active oil and gas wells in California and low birth-weight infants, adding to findings elsewhere on health risks from oil and gas production.
A satellite image of the oil slick as it looked in late May 2010, a month after the Deepwater Horizon well exploded. The oil plume looks grayish white. NASA/Goddard/Jen Shoemaker and Stu Snodgrass

A decade after the Deepwater Horizon explosion, offshore drilling is still unsafe

The BP Deepwater Horizon blowout on April 20, 2010 triggered the largest offshore oil spill in history. Ten years later, post-spill reforms are being undone and the Gulf of Mexico remains vulnerable.
Expanding solar power potential more than it’s needed could replace more expensive energy storage. Jamey Stillings

A radical idea to get a high-renewable electric grid: Build way more solar and wind than needed

Solar and wind can’t deliver power on demand. But overbuilding solar and wind, and simply dumping unneeded energy, would go a long way to smoothing out those bumps, study finds.
Protesters at a hearing on President Donald Trump’s plan to allow offshore oil and gas drilling along most of the nation’s coastline, Feb. 14, 2018 in Hamilton, N.J. AP Photo/Wayne Parry

Trump offshore drilling plan may be dead in the water, but there are better ways to lead on energy

The Trump administration plan to expand offshore oil and gas production along US coastlines faces serious roadblocks. But there are smarter ways to pursue ‘energy dominance.’
Rather than fade into the night, coal plants could stick around longer under Trump’s proposal. Duke Energy

Trump’s coal plan – neither clean nor affordable

Trump’s energy plan may meet the letter of the law but the Affordable Clean Energy Plan reflects the administration’s clear agenda to move slowly or not at all on climate change.
The number of coal mining jobs has gone up slightly, but many times less than solar-related ones. AP Photo/Dake Kang

An alternative to propping up coal power plants: Retrain workers for solar

The Trump administration’s Affordable Clean Energy Plan would help the declining coal industry, but a study shows many coal workers could transition to a new industry – solar – and earn more money.

Les contributeurs les plus fréquents

Plus