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Articles on Hospitals

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Business restrictions early in the pandemic, when rural towns had few cases, triggered a backlash that haunts them now. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

In rural America, resentment over COVID-19 shutdowns is colliding with rising case numbers

Coronavirus cases have risen sharply across the Mountain West, Midwest and plains. Over 70% of nonmetropolitan counties are now "red zones," suggesting viral spread is out of control.
The arrival of flu season will put more pressure on hospitals already facing the coronavirus pandemic. Jeffrey Basinger/Newsday via Getty Images

What happens when COVID-19 and influenza collide? Can hospitals handle the strain?

Pandemic policy experts offer 10 recommendations that could reduce the risk that a bad flu season on top of the COVID-19 pandemic will overwhelm hospitals.
Telehealth is booming like never before, and many patients and health care providers across the U.S. are using it for the first time. Geber86 / E+ via Getty Images

Is telehealth as good as in-person care? A telehealth researcher explains how to get the most out of remote health care

Telehealth has seen massive increases in use since the pandemic started. When done right, remote health care can be just as effective as in-person medicine.
The coronavirus pandemic has created an environment of uncertainty, fear and despair – emotions that erode mental health. AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy

A perfect storm for medical PTSD: Isolation, intensive care and the coronavirus pandemic

COVID-19 patients are spending weeks in intensive care units, isolated and alone, knowing they have a disease that doctors don't fully understand. It's a recipe for post-traumatic stress disorder.
Emergency rooms across the country have seen sharp drops in the number of patients seeking care for problems other than COVID-19. AAron Ontiveroz/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images

‘I thought I could wait this out’: Fearing coronavirus, patients delayed hospital visits, putting health and lives at risk

Delaying medical care comes at a cost, both human and financial. The patients some emergency rooms have been seeing are a lot sicker and more likely to need hospitalization.
As larger percentages of the U.S. population become infected, a study shows how direct medical expenses for treating COVID-19 will rise. Those costs will come back to everyone. Scott Eisen/Getty Images

Coronavirus medical costs could soar into hundreds of billions as more Americans become infected

Reopening state economies too soon risks a second wave of the pandemic, and a surge in medical costs. Anyone who pays insurance premiums and taxes will be picking up the tab.
In the rural South, chronic illnesses are common, the population is older and health care options have been declining as hospitals close. All put the population at higher risk from COVID-19. AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis

Coronavirus is spreading through rural South’s high-risk population – reopening economies will make it worse

Southern governors are starting to reopen their economies at the same time COVID-19 cases are spreading through the rural South.
A nurse (left) operates a robot used to interact remotely with coronavirus patients while a physician looks on. MIGUEL MEDINA/AFP via Getty Images

Robots are playing many roles in the coronavirus crisis – and offering lessons for future disasters

Robots are helping health care workers and public safety officials more safely and quickly treat coronavirus patients and contain the pandemic. They have something in common: They're tried and tested.
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Can coronavirus spread 4 metres?

A recent study suggested the coronavirus could spread up to four metres. But the evidence isn't strong enough to suggest we should change social distancing advice from 1.5 metres.

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