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Public assistance programs are intended to help people up – but that’s not always how recipients experience the aid. Ascent/PKS Media Inc./Getty

Life on welfare isn’t what most people think it is

The stories people tell about welfare rarely match up with the stories told by people actually receiving aid.
Laura Kelly, governor-elect of Kansas, was part of the blue wave in November. Kelly, shown here in October, opposes Medicaid work requirements. AP Photo/John Hanna

Medicaid work requirements: Where do they stand after the blue wave?

Republicans have sought to limit Medicaid, and a key component of those efforts is requiring that those who receive Medicaid benefits work. But many already do, and others can't, a scholar explains.
When President Bill Cllinton officially ended welfare as we knew it, he was flanked by women who had received Aid to Families with Dependent Children. Reuters/Stephen Jaffee

Welfare as we know it now: 6 questions answered

Trump's rationale for cutting the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families program rests on a myth at odds with contemporary data.
Relatively few low-income Americans are getting welfare payments these days. Christine Hoi/Shutterstock.com

The bigotry baked into welfare cuts

Misleading stereotypes help explain why the share of families living in poverty who benefit from a core assistance program has plummeted -- and why Trump wants new cuts.
A patient who relied on Medicaid and a nurse in Mississippi. Jonathan Bachman/REUTERS

Trump wants to change Medicaid funding; could his ideas work?

President Trump has proposed a major funding shift for Medicaid, the joint federal-state program that pays for health care for about 75 million poor people. Would the safety net fray if he did so?

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