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Articles on Vaccine misinformation

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An 1801 etching of a dandified physician taking a lancet to a ‘dindonnade,’ a word signifying both ‘turkey’ and ‘hoax.’ It ridicules the smallpox vaccine, which takes fluid from an animal to insert into a human. (Wellcome Collection)

COVID-19 anti-vaxxers use the same arguments from 135 years ago

The history of anti-vaccination theories can help us understand how such claims capture a popular following. The same misinformation used against 19th century smallpox vaccine is still in use today.
Scott Barbour/AAP

Coronavirus misinformation is a global issue, but which myth you fall for likely depends on where you live

When it comes to COVID-19 misinformation, not all nations are the same. Some are peddling a larger variety of myths than others - and each seems to have its own personal favourite.
Shannon Rose, left, joined other demonstrators calling for Gov. Gavin Newsom to end the stay-at-home orders during a protest at the state capitol in Sacramento, Calif., on May 9, 2020. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

Cell tower vandals and re-open protestors — why some people believe in coronavirus conspiracies

From political ideologies, conspiracy theories or “reopen” protests, when faced with uncertainty, we seek reassurance in the face of mortality through efforts at containment.
Californians in June 2015 protest a bill that did away with personal belief exemptions for vaccinating children before they enter school. Rich Pedroncelli/AP Photo

Countering misinformation about flu vaccine is harder than it seems

Vaccination rates for children in some parts of California are down, despite a law that narrowed exemptions. Here's a look at why people refuse to listen to evidence when it comes to the flu vaccine.

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