Menú Close

Artículos sobre artists

Mostrando 1 - 20 de 35 artículos

‘Isolated Grave and Camouflage, Vimy Ridge,’ by Mary Riter Hamilton, May 1919, oil on wove paper. (Library and Archives Canada, Acc. No. 1988-180-223, Copy negative C-141851)

Remembrance Day: How a Canadian painter broke boundaries on the First World War battlefields

After Canadian painter Mary Riter Hamilton was rejected for service as a war artist because she was a woman, she trekked battlefields to create more than 320 works that recall the missing soldiers.
The National Arts Centre in Ottawa displays the message “Everything will be okay” and a rainbow, in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic in April 2020. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang)

Support for artists is key to returning to vibrant cultural life post-coronavirus

Policy makers and arts sectors together need to reimagine how we might organize contracts, leverage networks and change supports to create more long-term opportunities for arts workers in Canada.
Volunteers helped city workers paint ‘Black Lives Matter’ on the street near the White House. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

How DC Mayor Bowser used graffiti to protect public space

Washington, DC Mayor Muriel Bowser ordered 'BLACK LIVES MATTER' to be painted on a street near the White House. The act would have been considered vandalism had it not been done by city workers.
Rather than blank boarded-up storefronts, artists in Vancouver have created murals to offer inspiration, public health messaging and beauty during the coronavirus pandemic. This one is by Will Phillips. (Eugene McCann)

COVID-19 murals express hope and help envision urban futures

During COVID-19, boarded-up storefronts host various new types of inspirational, informational and decorative murals that should be read critically as representing political agendas for the future.
Visitors walk through Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama’s installation ‘Fireflies on the Water.’ maurizio mucciola/flickr

In dandelions and fireflies, artists try to make sense of climate change

Images of wildfires are powerful, but can make climate catastrophe seem like something spectacular and distant. So some artists are focusing on the plants and bugs in our immediate surroundings.
The 2002 installation ‘Rape Garage’ displayed statistics about rape, along with first-person narratives about sexual trauma. Stefanie Bruser, Josh Edwards, Katie Grone and Lindsey Lee. Mixed media site installation at “At Home: A Kentucky Project with Judy Chicago and Donald Woodman.” 2001-2002. Courtesy the Flower Archive, housed at the Pennsylvania State University Archives.

A half-century before the hashtag, artists were on the front lines of #MeToo

Many Renaissance-era masterworks depicted rape and sexual assault as erotic. Beginning in the 1970s, artists worked to redefine rape as a crime of aggression and act of female subjugation.
Preliminary drawing of title page for ‘Where the Wild Things Are’ (New York: Harper & Row, 1963), 26:7, The Maurice Sendak Collection. Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Library. © The Maurice Sendak Foundation.

From ‘Wild Horses’ to ‘Wild Things,’ a window into Maurice Sendak’s creative process

The book took eight years from conception to publication. In the earliest dummy, the monsters that millions have grown to love actually started out as horses.
Moliere Dimanche would use anything he could scrounge up – pieces of folders, the back of commissary forms, old letters – as canvases. Moliere Dimanche

Through his art, a former prisoner diagnoses the systemic sickness of Florida’s penitentiaries

From solitary confinement, Moliere Dimanche started drawing on anything he could find. The result was a series of fantastical, allegorical images that depict abuse, racism and profound isolation.

Principales colaboradores

Más