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Artículos sobre H1N1 influenza

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Patients with overweight or obesity issues make up more than 70% of the U.S. population. Peter Dazeley via Getty Images

Will the COVID-19 vaccine work as well in patients with obesity?

Americans with excess weight and obesity have been hit hard by COVID-19. Now there is reason to believe they may not get the same protection from the vaccines.
Albanian health department workers, wearing protective suits, collect chickens, in the village of Peze Helmes some 20 km from the capital Tirana, 23 March 2006, after the second case of H5N1 bird flu was discovered in Albania. Gent Shkullaku / AFP

The keys to preventing future pandemics

Ever since the 2001 SARS outbreak and H5N1 avian flu in 2003, we’ve developed tools to monitor diseases that transmitted from animals to humans. But what does a large-scale roll-out entail?
Emergency hospital during influenza epidemic at Camp Funston in Kansas around 1918. National Museum of Health and Medicine

5 ways the world is better off dealing with a pandemic now than in 1918

A century ago, the influenza pandemic killed about 50 million people. Today we are battling the coronavirus pandemic. Are we any better off? Two social scientists share five reasons we have to be optimistic.
A pandemic from a century ago doesn’t necessarily chart the course of the pandemic happening now. National Photo Company Collection/Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division/Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

Compare the flu pandemic of 1918 and COVID-19 with caution – the past is not a prediction

Differences in the viruses' biology and societal contexts mean there's no guarantee today's pandemic will mirror the 'waves' of infection a century ago.
The pangolin, one of the most poached animals in the world, could have served as an intermediate host in the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 to humans. Wahyudi/AFP

Covid-19 or the pandemic of mistreated biodiversity

Covid-19, like other major epidemics, is not unrelated to the biodiversity and climate crisis we are experiencing.
A member of the South African National Defence Force hands out pamphlets informing township residents about COVID-19 in Johannesburg. Kim Ludbrook/EPA-EFE

Can the philosophy of ubuntu help provide a way to face health crises?

Ubuntu provides a language for people to participate in preventive action, even if this involves practices such as lockdowns.
A health-care worker prepares for the opening of the COVID-19 Assessment Centre in Ottawa, during a media tour on March 13, 2020. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang)

Coronavirus: Canada’s response hits a turning point

As response to COVID-19 moves from a learning phase to an operational phase, lessons from the 2009 H1N1 pandemic can inform Canada's action plan.
A security guard wears gloves while holding a basketball during halftime of an NBA game in Houston on March 5, 2020. The NBA has told players to avoid high-fiving fans and to avoid taking any item for autographs. AP Photo/David J. Phillip

How big will the coronavirus epidemic be? An epidemiologist updates his concerns

Initial data from the outbreak in China did not reveal as much information as scientists needed to assess the epidemic. Now, more accurate data suggest an epidemic worse than some previously thought.
Commuters jam a Toronto subway platform. Widespread adoption of habits that help prevent infection may boost behavioural herd immunity. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graeme Roy

Coronavirus: How behaviour can help control the spread of COVID-19

Large-scale adoption of simple, individual actions — like disinfecting our germ-laden phone screens — can limit the ability of COVID-19 to get a foothold.

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