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Artículos sobre Marine science

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S Wright

In a first discovery of its kind, researchers have uncovered an ancient Aboriginal archaeological site preserved on the seabed

Submerged in the waters off Western Australia lies an ancient site home to Aboriginal people thousands of years ago, when sea levels were lower than they are today.
Researchers use Atlantic mackerel for bait on long-lining fishing sampling expeditions in the Gulf of Mexico.. C-IMAGE Consortium

Scientists have found oil from the Deepwater Horizon blowout in fishes’ livers and on the deep ocean floor

The Deepwater Horizon oil disaster catalyzed a decade of research on oil contamination in the Gulf of Mexico, from surface waters to the seabed, with surprising findings.
A researcher completing bleaching surveys in the southern Great Barrier Reef after a major bleaching event. ARC CENTRE OF EXCELLENCE FOR CORAL REEF STUDIES

‘This situation brings me to despair’: two reef scientists share their climate grief

Few feel the pain of the Great Barrier Reef's decline more acutely than the scientists trying to save it. Ahead of a UN climate summit, two researchers write of their grief, and hope.
Delegates at this week’s marine science conference in Fremantle take a plastic-free coffee break. Alicia Sutton/AMSA

We organised a conference for 570 people without using plastic. Here’s how it went

This year's national conference of the Australian Marine Science Association is a plastic-free zone, as marine scientists aim to reduce the environmental burden of throwaway plastic.
A few days after baby molluscs come out from tiny eggs, they start building their shell layer after layer. Emily Nunnell/The Conversation NY-BD-CC

Curious Kids: how do shells get made?

Molluscs that have shells - like pipis, clams and oysters - have to build their own shell from scratch. And they keep building it their whole life, using chemicals from the sea and their own bodies.
The scientific drilling ship JOIDES Resolution arrives in Honolulu after successful sea trials and testing of scientific and drilling equipment. IODP

Scientists have been drilling into the ocean floor for 50 years – here’s what they’ve found so far

The ocean floor holds unique information about Earth's history. Scientific ocean drilling, which started 50 years ago, has yielded insights into climate change, geohazards and the key conditions for life.
Successive governments have seen the Great Barrier Reef not just as a scientific wonder, but as a channel to further economic development. Superjoseph/Shutterstock.com

Politicised science on the Great Barrier Reef? It’s been that way for more than a century

The $444 million awarded to the Great Barrier Reef Foundation has been criticised as a politically calculated move. But governments have been asking what the reef can do for them ever since colonial times.
The Byron Scar, left behind by an undersea landslide. Colours indicate depths. Samantha Clarke

Scars left by Australia’s undersea landslides reveal future tsunami potential

The ocean floor off Australia's east coast bears the scars of numerous subsea landslides, which have potentially triggered tsunamis over the past several millennia.
Steven Morgan deploys ABLE robots in a swimming pool to test how well their programs simulate larval behavior. University of California, Davis

Underwater robots help scientists see where marine larvae go and how they get there

Most ocean species start out as larvae drifting with currents. Using underwater robots, scientists have found that larvae use swimming motions to affect their course and reach suitable places to grow.

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