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Artículos sobre US politics

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In a widely publicized speech on the House floor, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez carefully analyzed the harmful effects of sexism in Congress. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc. via Getty Images

How sexist abuse of women in Congress amounts to political violence – and undermines American democracy

Misogyny combined with partisan vitriol is a dangerous combination for women politicians and American democracy, says a recent House resolution denouncing 'violence against women in politics.'
The Senate wing of the U.S. Capitol building. Matt H. Wade via Wikimedia Commons

What happens when senators die or are incapacitated?

With several senators testing positive for the coronavirus, and many older than 65, political scientists look at 1954, when senators' deaths changed control of the chamber.
With rare exceptions, like the 2000 presidential election, the winning candidate usually declares victory on election night. But the win isn’t actually certified until January. ranklin McMahon/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images

Who formally declares the winner of the US presidential election?

No, it's not the TV news networks. The American election certification process is a lot more complicated than that.
Highly skilled workers and international students in the U.S. are the latest group to be targeted by the Trump adminstration’s restrictive immigration policies. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Trump’s suspension of H-1B visas is a racist attack on immigrants — and a bad move for the economy

By making skilled workers the target of his latest anti-immigration policy, U.S. president Trump signals that he is willing to play to his far right base even if it undermines America's economic interests.
A protester raises a fist in New York’s Washington Square Park during a June 2, 2020 demonstration. Ira L. Black/Corbis via Getty Images

Where are the African American leaders?

Sweeping changes were possible in the past because black leaders were willing to risk their lives and call out problems before they became crises.
U.S. President Donald Trump takes questions from reporters during a Coronavirus Task Force press briefing in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, D.C., on March 30, 2020. Madel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Claims of ideological bias among the media may be overblown

Though political elites complain about what the media covers, and how they cover it, research shows that ideological bias among media outlets is largely nonexistent.

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