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Articles sur COVID-19

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The coronavirus forced the editors of the Oxford English Dictionary to break with tradition. Illustration by Anurag Papolu/The Conversation; dictionary photo by Spauln via Getty Images and model of COVID-19 by fpm/iStock via Getty Images

How COVID-19 is changing the English language

Updates to the Oxford English Dictionary provide a fascinating glimpse into how language changes in the face of rapid and unprecedented social and economic disruption.
Protesters attend a demonstration in support of migrant worker in front of the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada in Toronto in August 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov

Throne speech offers little systemic change for migrant workers, refugees

The federal government must make good on its throne speech language about making it easier for migrant workers to formally become Canadian by instituting a comprehensive regularization plan.
In order to contain a deadly virus, the COVID Alert app needs to go viral. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

The second wave is here. Have you installed the COVID Alert app?

Ironically, to encourage people to download the COVID Alert app, we need viral processes as we attempt to contain an actual virus. And that's a challenge when we're socially isolated.
Football players from Lee Central High School in Bishopville, South Carolina, share a meal with players from the Robert E. Lee Academy. Lee County in South Carolina is still segregated. Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Pandemic school funding debate in South Carolina rekindles Jim Crow-era controversy

The battle to expand private education in South Carolina amid the pandemic mirrors previous struggles over civil rights and highlights the ways systemic racism has undermined public education.

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