Artikel-artikel mengenai Latin America

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Satere-mawe Indigenous men in face masks paddle the Ariau River, in hard-hit Manaus state, during the coronavirus pandemic, May 5, 2020. Ricardo Oliveira /AFP via Getty Images

Brazil’s Bolsonaro has COVID-19 – and so do thousands of Indigenous people who live days from the nearest hospital

Indigenous communities were already suffering badly under Bolsonaro. Now, COVID-19 threatens their very survival.
Protesters cross the Brooklyn Bridge on June 19, 2020 – Juneteenth – in the United States’ third straight week of protest. Pablo Monsalve / VIEWpress via Getty Images

George Floyd protests aren’t just anti-racist – they are anti-authoritarian

Unrest in the US looks familiar to Latin Americans, who are accustomed to resisting undemocratic governments – and to their protest movements being met with violent suppression.
Protesters in São Paulo declare ‘Black Lives Matter’ at a June 7 protest spurred by both U.S. anti-racist protests and the coronavirus’s heavy toll on black Brazilians. Marcello Zambrana/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

COVID-19 is deadlier for black Brazilians, a legacy of structural racism that dates back to slavery

In Brazil, black COVID-19 patients are dying at higher rates than white patients. Worse housing quality, working conditions and health care help to explain the pandemic's racially disparate toll.
Venezuelans try to enter Colombia at the closed Simon Bolivar international bridge borders crossing, March 16, 2020. Normally, 40,000 Venezuelans come into Colombia every day. Schneyder Mendoza/AFP via Getty Images)

Venezuelan migrants face crime, conflict and coronavirus at Colombia’s closed border

The coronavirus-related closure of the Colombian border hasn't stopped desperate Venezuelans from entering – but it has made the trip more dangerous.
Ladijane Sofia da Concecão, one of millions of unemployed housekeepers in Brazil, accepts a food donation from a friend in São Paulo, May 7, 2020. Alexandre Schneider/Getty Images

In Brazil’s raging pandemic, domestic workers fear for their lives – and their jobs

Maids were among Brazil's earliest COVID-19 victims, infected by employers who had been to Italy. Now 39% of Brazilian 'domésticas' have been let go, most without severance or sick leave.
Even before COVID-19, El Salvador’s prisons were contagious disease hotspots. Here, MS-13 gang members with tuberculosis at Chalatenango prison, March 29, 2019. Marvin Recinos/AFP via Getty Images

Mass arrests and overcrowded prisons in El Salvador spark fear of coronavirus crisis

El Salvador is arresting thousands of people for violating its COVID-19 quarantine, further packing a 'hellish' penal system once described as a 'petri dish' for infectious disease.
Valley of the Dawn members celebrate ‘Day of the Indoctrinator’ at their temple complex in Brazil on May 1. This year’s event is postponed due to coronavirus. Márcia Alves

Brazilian mystics say they’re sent by aliens to ‘jump-start human evolution’ – but their vision for a more just society is not totally crazy

Brazil's Valley of the Dawn faith is often dismissed as a cult. But many of the group's fantastical rituals are a recognizable reaction to this harsh world of inequality, loneliness and pandemics.
Coffins await burial at the Jardines de Esperanza cemetery in Guayaquil, Ecuador, April 10, 2020. Eduardo Maquilon/Getty Images

Deaths and desperation mount in Ecuador, epicenter of coronavirus pandemic in Latin America

Dead bodies left at home and in streets. Quarantined people facing hunger. Political turmoil. Ecuador's coronavirus outbreak is a grim forecast of what may await poorer countries when COVID-19 hits.
Antonio, from the Yanomami village of Watoriki, photographed in November 1992. After contact with Brazilian society in the 1970s, more than half the Yanomami population died from infectious diseases. William Milliken

Covid-19, isolated indigenous peoples and the history of the Amazon

There are telling parallels between the current pandemic and those that decimated indigenous populations in the post-Columbian era in the Amazon.
He may be praying, but so far the Pope has declined to intervene in Venezuela’s crisis to aid a unified coronavirus response. LUIS ACOSTA/AFP via Getty Images

Catholic Church urges Venezuela to unite against coronavirus

If anyone can convince the Maduro government and the Venezuelan opposition to come together to fight COVID-19, it's the Pope. But the Church's power to negotiate an emergency deal is limited.
Health workers test for COVID-19 in Asuncion, Paraguay. Nathalia Aguilar/EPA

Coronavirus: a warning to Latin America and the Caribbean to dramatically increase COVID-19 testing

A group of population experts have called on governments in Latin American and the Caribbean to urgently ramp up testing for COVID-19 before it's too late.
Undocumented migrants climb on a train known as ‘La Bestia’ in Las Patronas town, Veracruz state, Mexico, Aug. 9, 2018, to travel through Mexico and reach the U.S. Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP via Getty Images

Migrants at US-Mexico border must get past cartels before their long journey ends

The US may be in sight from the border towns of Sonora, Mexico, but the trip is far from over. Cartels control the desert territory that divides the two countries – and no one gets through for free.
South America’s bi-oceanic highway, which will stretch from the Pacific to the Atlantic – cutting right through Paraguay – is scheduled for completion in 2022. Joel Correia

Mennonites helped turn Paraguay into a mega beef producer – indigenous people may pay the price

Mennonites settled in Paraguay's arid Chaco forest a century ago, fleeing religious persecution. Their agricultural success is now driving deforestation, social change and rapid development.

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