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Stockholm University

In a changing and globalised world, Stockholm University contributes to the development of a sustainable democratic society through knowledge, enlightenment and the pursuit of truth, based on critical thinking.

Ranked among the world’s top 100 universities, Stockholm University is one of Europe’s leading centres for higher education and research in human science and science. With a large number of students, a wide range of education in close interaction with research, and a combination of independent basic research and strong applied research, Stockholm University contributes actively to society – a role that has characterized the University since its inception in 1878.

Currently, the university has 33,000 students, 1,600 doctoral students, and 5,500 members of staff active in the scientific areas of human science and science. We offer 190 programmes and 1,700 courses in science, humanities, social sciences and law, including 75 master’s programmes taught in English. The university has a total revenue of SEK 4.93 billion.

Stockholm University is an international academic environment, which is an integral part of excellence in research and education. As a university in the capital city of Sweden, Stockholm University places special emphasis on offering courses and programmes that meet the needs of the region and society. Collaboration makes Stockholm University’s expertise and results available and promotes quality in education and life-long learning.

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The Cover of Swedish rapper Yasin’s second album featured his passport stamped with “convicted in advance” on it. Byn Block Entertainment

Swedish gangsta rap exposes a dark side of the country some would rather ignore

“Sweden’s most wanted”, raps the controversial artist Yasin in his track 20 Talet. The rapper’s lyrics are without filter, direct, raw, born within a marginalised and often criminal environment, depicting…
Grave from France where the individual was moved around before he fully decomposed. Éveha-Études et valorisations archéologiques/G Grange

Archeologists long believed that ancient graves were robbed all over Europe, but here’s why they’re wrong

All over Europe, early medieval graves look like they were robbed long ago. But new research suggests that relatives re-opened them to take out heirlooms and make connections with the dead.
Claudio Furlan/AP/AAP

The climate crisis gives science a new role. Here’s how research ethics must change too

Research ethics focus on avoiding wrongdoing, having been developed largely in response to biomedical scandals. Climate change puts the onus on researchers to add ‘do good’ to ‘do no harm’ principles.

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