Menu Close

University of Arizona

The University of Arizona is working together to expand human potential, explore new horizons and enrich life for all. As a land-grant university with two independently accredited medical schools, the University of Arizona is one of the nation’s top public universities, according to U.S. News & World Report. Established in 1885, the university is widely recognized as a student-centric university and has been designated as a Hispanic Serving Institution by the U.S. Department of Education. The university ranked in the top 25 in 2018 in research expenditures among all public universities, according to the National Science Foundation, and is a leading Research 1 institution with $687 million in annual research expenditures. The University of Arizona is a member of the Association of American Universities, the 65 leading public and private research universities in the U.S. It benefits the state with an estimated economic impact of $4.1 billion annually.

Links

Displaying 1 - 20 of 152 articles

The white ‘bathtub ring’ around Lake Mead, shown on Jan. 11, 2022, is roughly 160 feet high and reflects falling water levels. George Rose/Getty Images

What is dead pool? A water expert explains

The Colorado River provides water and electricity to 40 million people in the western US, but falling water levels threaten both of those resources.
Scientists think there are 300 million habitable planets in the Milky Way, and some may be home to intelligent life. Bruno Gilli/ESO

Blasting out Earth’s location with the hope of reaching aliens is a controversial idea – two teams of scientists are doing it anyway

This year, two groups of astronomers plan to send messages containing information about humans and the location of Earth toward parts of space they think may be home to intelligent life.
@DLorrey, NIWA

The Zealandia Switch drove rapid global ice retreat 18,000 years ago. Has it switched to a new level?

Rocks deposited by vanishing glaciers in the Southern Alps thousands of years ago hold climate clues about the past, painting a bleak picture about the long-term survival of alpine ice in New Zealand.
Damaged radar arrays and other equipment is seen at a Ukrainian military facility outside Mariupol, Ukraine, Feb. 24, 2022. AP Photo/Sergei Grits

Russia invades Ukraine – 5 essential reads from experts

As war begins between Ukraine and Russia, a range of stories provides context to help readers understand the conflict.
Commercial satellite companies provide views once reserved for governments, like this image of a Russian military training facility in Crimea. Satellite image (c) 2021 Maxar Technologies via Getty Images

Technology is revolutionizing how intelligence is gathered and analyzed – and opening a window onto Russian military activity around Ukraine

National security professionals and armchair sleuths alike are taking advantage of vast amounts of publicly available information and software tools to monitor geopolitical events around the world.
People are good at avoiding prying eyes, but avoiding online snoops – not so much. Donald Iain Smith/Moment via Getty Images

Your sense of privacy evolved over millennia – that puts you at risk today but could improve technology tomorrow

You have a finely honed sense of privacy in the physical world. But the sights and sounds you encounter online don’t help you detect risks and can even lull you into a false sense of security.
Washington state was home to some of the nation’s first dispensaries for legalized marijuana. AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Legalizing recreational pot may have spurred economic activity in first 4 states to do so

Colorado, Washington, Alaska and Oregon all experienced big increases in both deposits and lending shortly after legalizing marijuana for recreational use.
Groundwater is used for irrigation and drinking water, but those wells are rarely more than one kilometre deep. A huge volume of salty water exists as much as 10 kilometres below the Earth’s surface. (Shutterstock)

Groundwater — not ice sheets — is the largest source of water on land and most of it is ancient

Groundwater is the second-largest store of water on Earth. Governments and industry use groundwater reservoirs to store waste, but it may also have environmental functions that haven’t been revealed.
The Taliban retook control of Afghanistan in August 2021, without major opposition. Photo by Mohd Rasfan /AFP via Getty Image

Taliban 2.0 aren’t so different from the first regime, after all

Four months after the Taliban regained control of Afghanistan, a clearer picture of their rule is emerging. Despite public assurances, the Taliban continue to violate human rights.
Be kind rewind. Rokas Tenys/Shutterstock

From speed viewing to watching the end first: how streaming has changed the way we consume TV

Some viewers purposefully seek out spoilers, others skip scenes with characters they don’t like. The advent of streaming has made viewers more actives and producers should take note.

Authors

More Authors